Dihydroxyacetone in the Floral Nectar of Ericomyrtus serpyllifolia (Turcz.) Rye (Myrtaceae) and Verticordia chrysantha Endl. (Myrtaceae) Demonstrates That This Precursor to Bioactive Honey Is Not Restricted to the Genus Leptospermum (Myrtaceae)

Sylvester A. Obeng-Darko, Jean Sloan, Rachel M. Binks, Peter R. Brooks, Erik J. Veneklaas, Patrick M. Finnegan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ma ̅nuka honey is known for its strong bioactivity,whicharises from the autocatalytic conversion of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone (dihydroxyacetone,DHA) in the floral nectar of Leptospermum scoparium (Myrtaceae) to the non-peroxide antibacterial compound methylglyoxalduring honey maturation. DHA is also a minor constituent of the nectarof several other Leptospermum species.This study used high-performance liquid chromatography to test whetherDHA was present in the floral nectar of five species in other generaof the family Myrtaceae: Ericomyrtus serpyllifolia (Turcz.) Rye, Chamelaucium sp. Bendering(T.J. Alford 110), Kunzea pulchella (Lindl.) A.S. George, Verticordia chrysantha Endl., and Verticordia picta Endl.DHA was found in the floral nectar of two of the five species: E. serpyllifolia and V. chrysantha. The average amount of DHA detected was 0.08 and 0.64 & mu;g perflower, respectively. These findings suggest that the accumulationof DHA in floral nectar is a shared trait among several genera withinthe family Myrtaceae. Consequently, non-peroxide-based bioactive honeymay be sourced from floral nectar outside the genus Leptospermum.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7703-7709
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume71
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 May 2023

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