Dietary Vitamin K1 intake is associated with lower long-term fracture-related hospitalization risk: the Perth longitudinal study of ageing women

Marc Sim, Andre Strydom, Lauren C. Blekkenhorst, Nicola P. Bondonno, Rachel McCormick, Wai H. Lim, Kun Zhu, Elizabeth Byrnes, Jonathan M. Hodgson, Joshua R. Lewis, Richard L. Prince

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the association between dietary Vitamin K1 intake with fracture-related hospitalizations over 14.5 years in community-dwelling older Australian women (n = 1373, >= 70 years). Dietary Vitamin K1 intake at baseline (1998) was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire and a new Australian Vitamin K nutrient database, which was supplemented with published data. Over 14.5 years, any fracture (n = 404, 28.3%) and hip fracture (n = 153, 10.7%) related hospitalizations were captured using linked health data. Plasma Vitamin D status (25OHD) and the ratio of undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) to total osteocalcin (tOC) from serum was assessed at baseline. Estimates of dietary Vitamin K1 intake were supported by a significant inverse association with ucOC : tOC; a marker of Vitamin K status (r = -0.12, p < 0.001). Compared to women with the lowest Vitamin K1 intake (Quartile 1, = 99 mu g d(-1)) had lower hazards for any fracture- (HR 0.69 95%CI 0.52-0.91, p < 0.001) and hip fracture-related hospitalization (HR 0.51 95%CI 0.32-0.79, p < 0.001), independent of 25OHD levels, as part of multivariable-adjusted analysis. Spline analysis suggested a nadir in the relative hazard for any fracture-related hospitalizations at a Vitamin K1 intake of approximately 100 mu g day(-1). For hip fractures, a similar relationship was apparent. Higher dietary Vitamin K1 is associated with lower long-term risk for any fracture- and hip fracture-related hospitalizations in community-dwelling older women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10642-10650
Number of pages9
JournalFood & function
Volume13
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Sept 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Dietary Vitamin K1 intake is associated with lower long-term fracture-related hospitalization risk: the Perth longitudinal study of ageing women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this