Dietary saturated fat intake and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in elderly women: a prospective cohort study

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    Abstract

    Background: The reduction of saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake has been the basis of long-standing dietary recommendations. However, recent epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting evidence in the relation between SFA consumption and risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) mortality.

    Objective: We investigated the association of SFA intake with serum lipid profiles and ASVD mortality in a population-based 10-y cohort study.

    Design: At baseline (1998) 1469 women living in Perth, Western Australia, with a mean ± SD age of 75.2 ± 2.7 y had SFA intake measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Outcome data were serum lipids at baseline and ASVD deaths over 10 y (13,649 person-years of follow-up), retrieved from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Other risk factors for ASVD were assessed and adjusted for in multivariable analyses.

    Results: ASVD deaths occurred in 9.1% (134) of participants. The highest quartile of SFA intake (>31.28 g/d) had an ∼16% cumulative mortality risk compared with ∼5% in the lowest quartile (<17.39 g/d) (HR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.54, 6.11; P = 0.001). Baseline SFA intake was associated with baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol in multivariable-adjusted models (β: 0.199, SE: 0.056, P < 0.001 and β: 0.190, SE: 0.051, P < 0.001, respectively). However, baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol were not associated with ASVD mortality.

    Conclusions: High SFA intake was associated with the risk of ASVD mortality in this population of elderly women. Although there was a strong positive association between SFA intake and LDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol was not associated with ASVD mortality in this cohort. Nevertheless, these data support dietary advice to reduce SFA intake.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1263-1268
    JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
    Volume101
    Issue number6
    Early online date6 May 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

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    Dietary Fats
    Vascular Diseases
    Cohort Studies
    Fatty Acids
    Prospective Studies
    Mortality
    LDL Cholesterol
    Serum
    Lipids
    Western Australia
    Information Storage and Retrieval
    Information Systems
    Population
    Epidemiologic Studies
    Food

    Cite this

    @article{cd0ba07ee07d4b5eb36790ca2340eb42,
    title = "Dietary saturated fat intake and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in elderly women: a prospective cohort study",
    abstract = "Background: The reduction of saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake has been the basis of long-standing dietary recommendations. However, recent epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting evidence in the relation between SFA consumption and risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) mortality. Objective: We investigated the association of SFA intake with serum lipid profiles and ASVD mortality in a population-based 10-y cohort study. Design: At baseline (1998) 1469 women living in Perth, Western Australia, with a mean ± SD age of 75.2 ± 2.7 y had SFA intake measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Outcome data were serum lipids at baseline and ASVD deaths over 10 y (13,649 person-years of follow-up), retrieved from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Other risk factors for ASVD were assessed and adjusted for in multivariable analyses. Results: ASVD deaths occurred in 9.1{\%} (134) of participants. The highest quartile of SFA intake (>31.28 g/d) had an ∼16{\%} cumulative mortality risk compared with ∼5{\%} in the lowest quartile (<17.39 g/d) (HR: 3.07; 95{\%} CI: 1.54, 6.11; P = 0.001). Baseline SFA intake was associated with baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol in multivariable-adjusted models (β: 0.199, SE: 0.056, P < 0.001 and β: 0.190, SE: 0.051, P < 0.001, respectively). However, baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol were not associated with ASVD mortality. Conclusions: High SFA intake was associated with the risk of ASVD mortality in this population of elderly women. Although there was a strong positive association between SFA intake and LDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol was not associated with ASVD mortality in this cohort. Nevertheless, these data support dietary advice to reduce SFA intake.",
    author = "Lauren Blekkenhorst and Richard Prince and Jonathan Hodgson and Wai Lim and Kun Zhu and A. Devine and P.L. Thompson and Joshua Lewis",
    year = "2015",
    month = "6",
    doi = "10.3945/ajcn.114.102392",
    language = "English",
    volume = "101",
    pages = "1263--1268",
    journal = "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
    issn = "0002-9165",
    publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
    number = "6",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Dietary saturated fat intake and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in elderly women: a prospective cohort study

    AU - Blekkenhorst, Lauren

    AU - Prince, Richard

    AU - Hodgson, Jonathan

    AU - Lim, Wai

    AU - Zhu, Kun

    AU - Devine, A.

    AU - Thompson, P.L.

    AU - Lewis, Joshua

    PY - 2015/6

    Y1 - 2015/6

    N2 - Background: The reduction of saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake has been the basis of long-standing dietary recommendations. However, recent epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting evidence in the relation between SFA consumption and risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) mortality. Objective: We investigated the association of SFA intake with serum lipid profiles and ASVD mortality in a population-based 10-y cohort study. Design: At baseline (1998) 1469 women living in Perth, Western Australia, with a mean ± SD age of 75.2 ± 2.7 y had SFA intake measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Outcome data were serum lipids at baseline and ASVD deaths over 10 y (13,649 person-years of follow-up), retrieved from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Other risk factors for ASVD were assessed and adjusted for in multivariable analyses. Results: ASVD deaths occurred in 9.1% (134) of participants. The highest quartile of SFA intake (>31.28 g/d) had an ∼16% cumulative mortality risk compared with ∼5% in the lowest quartile (<17.39 g/d) (HR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.54, 6.11; P = 0.001). Baseline SFA intake was associated with baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol in multivariable-adjusted models (β: 0.199, SE: 0.056, P < 0.001 and β: 0.190, SE: 0.051, P < 0.001, respectively). However, baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol were not associated with ASVD mortality. Conclusions: High SFA intake was associated with the risk of ASVD mortality in this population of elderly women. Although there was a strong positive association between SFA intake and LDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol was not associated with ASVD mortality in this cohort. Nevertheless, these data support dietary advice to reduce SFA intake.

    AB - Background: The reduction of saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake has been the basis of long-standing dietary recommendations. However, recent epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting evidence in the relation between SFA consumption and risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) mortality. Objective: We investigated the association of SFA intake with serum lipid profiles and ASVD mortality in a population-based 10-y cohort study. Design: At baseline (1998) 1469 women living in Perth, Western Australia, with a mean ± SD age of 75.2 ± 2.7 y had SFA intake measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Outcome data were serum lipids at baseline and ASVD deaths over 10 y (13,649 person-years of follow-up), retrieved from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Other risk factors for ASVD were assessed and adjusted for in multivariable analyses. Results: ASVD deaths occurred in 9.1% (134) of participants. The highest quartile of SFA intake (>31.28 g/d) had an ∼16% cumulative mortality risk compared with ∼5% in the lowest quartile (<17.39 g/d) (HR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.54, 6.11; P = 0.001). Baseline SFA intake was associated with baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol in multivariable-adjusted models (β: 0.199, SE: 0.056, P < 0.001 and β: 0.190, SE: 0.051, P < 0.001, respectively). However, baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol were not associated with ASVD mortality. Conclusions: High SFA intake was associated with the risk of ASVD mortality in this population of elderly women. Although there was a strong positive association between SFA intake and LDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol was not associated with ASVD mortality in this cohort. Nevertheless, these data support dietary advice to reduce SFA intake.

    U2 - 10.3945/ajcn.114.102392

    DO - 10.3945/ajcn.114.102392

    M3 - Article

    VL - 101

    SP - 1263

    EP - 1268

    JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

    JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

    SN - 0002-9165

    IS - 6

    ER -