Development of cryopreservation for Loxocarya cinerea - An endemic Australian plant species important for post-mining restoration

A. Kaczmarczyk, B. Funnekotter, Shane Turner, Eric Bunn, G. Bryant, T.E. Hunt, R.L. Mancera

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We report the development of a cryopreservation protocol for the endemic Western Australian plant species Loxocarya cinerea (Restionaceae). Shoot tips from two genotypes, SXH404 and SXH804, were cryopreserved using the droplet-vitrification technique. Control explants, which were cryoprotected, but not cooled, showed regeneration for both genotypes (SXH404, 22.1 ± 5.9%; SXH804, 67.7 ± 9.6%). Extension of incubation in PVS2 from 30 to 60 min did not lead to survival after cryopreservation. Thermal analysis using differential scanning calorimetry confirmed the beneficial effect of a loading phase but also revealed no or very little ice formation after cryoprotection of shoot tips in other treatments. Regeneration following cryopreservation was obtained for genotype SXH804 (4.3 ± 2.1%) but not for SXH404. Regenerated explants of L. cinerea SXH804 were morphologically identical to tissue-cultured plants. As an alternative to shoot tips, callus tissues of clone SXH404 were successfully cryopreserved (>66.7% post LN survival) using the same protocol. © CryoLetters.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)508-519
    JournalCryo-Letters
    Volume34
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Cryopreservation
    Genotype
    Regeneration
    Vitrification
    Differential Scanning Calorimetry
    Bony Callus
    Ice
    Clone Cells
    Hot Temperature
    Therapeutics

    Cite this

    Kaczmarczyk, A. ; Funnekotter, B. ; Turner, Shane ; Bunn, Eric ; Bryant, G. ; Hunt, T.E. ; Mancera, R.L. / Development of cryopreservation for Loxocarya cinerea - An endemic Australian plant species important for post-mining restoration. In: Cryo-Letters. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 5. pp. 508-519.
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    abstract = "We report the development of a cryopreservation protocol for the endemic Western Australian plant species Loxocarya cinerea (Restionaceae). Shoot tips from two genotypes, SXH404 and SXH804, were cryopreserved using the droplet-vitrification technique. Control explants, which were cryoprotected, but not cooled, showed regeneration for both genotypes (SXH404, 22.1 ± 5.9{\%}; SXH804, 67.7 ± 9.6{\%}). Extension of incubation in PVS2 from 30 to 60 min did not lead to survival after cryopreservation. Thermal analysis using differential scanning calorimetry confirmed the beneficial effect of a loading phase but also revealed no or very little ice formation after cryoprotection of shoot tips in other treatments. Regeneration following cryopreservation was obtained for genotype SXH804 (4.3 ± 2.1{\%}) but not for SXH404. Regenerated explants of L. cinerea SXH804 were morphologically identical to tissue-cultured plants. As an alternative to shoot tips, callus tissues of clone SXH404 were successfully cryopreserved (>66.7{\%} post LN survival) using the same protocol. {\circledC} CryoLetters.",
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    Development of cryopreservation for Loxocarya cinerea - An endemic Australian plant species important for post-mining restoration. / Kaczmarczyk, A.; Funnekotter, B.; Turner, Shane; Bunn, Eric; Bryant, G.; Hunt, T.E.; Mancera, R.L.

    In: Cryo-Letters, Vol. 34, No. 5, 2013, p. 508-519.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Funnekotter, B.

    AU - Turner, Shane

    AU - Bunn, Eric

    AU - Bryant, G.

    AU - Hunt, T.E.

    AU - Mancera, R.L.

    PY - 2013

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