Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary S-methyl cysteine sulfoxide from vegetables

Caroline R. Hill, Emma L. Connolly, Armaghan Shafaei, Lois Balmer, Liezhou Zhong, Taulant Muka, Antonietta Hayhoe, Shikha Saha, Richard J. Woodman, Joshua R. Lewis, Jonathan M. Hodgson, Lauren C. Blekkenhorst

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Abstract

A food composition database estimating S-methyl cysteine sulfoxide (SMCSO) was created following a systematic literature search. SMCSO data (705 entries) from 19 vegetables were summarised: brassicas (n = 10) and alliums (n = 9). The highest SMCSO in brassicas was reported in Brussels sprouts (median [range]: 318 [68−420] mg/100 g fresh weight (FW)) whilst the lowest was in radish (19 [4–45] mg/100 g FW). Brussels sprouts were almost twice as concentrated in SMCSO as cauliflower, followed by cabbage, kale, broccoli, kohlrabi, swede, Chinese cabbage, and turnips. The alliums highest in SMCSO were Chinese chives (271 [185−413] mg/100 g FW) followed by rakkyo and garlic, with substantially less found in shallots, onion, and leek. Literature reporting SMCSO content in food is sparse. Further research is required to quantify SMCSO in commercially available vegetables and other foods, in order to update and expand this database for application to large populations and future intervention studies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106151
JournalJournal of Food Composition and Analysis
Volume130
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2024

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