Development and initial validation of the Willingness to Compromise Scale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study introduced an individual difference construct of willingness to compromise and examined its implications for understanding and predicting career-related decisions in work settings. In Study 1 (N = 53), critical incidents of career decisions were analyzed to identify commonalities across different types of career-related compromises. In Study 2 (N = 171), an initial 17-item scale was developed and revised. In Study 3 (N = 201), the convergent and criterion-related validity of the scale was examined in relation to specific personality traits, regret, dealing with uncertainty, career adaptability, and a situational dilemma task. Willingness to compromise was negatively related to neuroticism, and positively related to dealing with uncertainty, openness to experience, and career adaptability; it also predicted responses to the situational dilemma task. Results provided support for the reliability and validity of the scale. © The Author(s) 2013.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)487-501
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Career Assessment
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Uncertainty
Reproducibility of Results
Individuality
Personality
Emotions
Compromise
Willingness
Career adaptability
Neuroticism
Openness
Critical incidents
Career decision
Personality traits
Individual differences
Commonality

Cite this

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Development and initial validation of the Willingness to Compromise Scale. / Wee, Serena.

In: Journal of Career Assessment, Vol. 21, No. 4, 11.2013, p. 487-501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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