Developing agency through good work: Longitudinal effects of job autonomy and skill utilization on locus of control

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier Inc. An internal locus of control has benefits for individuals across multiple life domains. Nevertheless, whether it is possible to enhance an individual's internal locus of control has rarely been considered. The authors propose that the presence of job autonomy and skill utilization in work can enhance internal locus of control, both directly and indirectly via job satisfaction. Three waves of data over a four-year period from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey (N = 3045) were analyzed. Results showed that job autonomy directly shaped internal locus of control over time, as did job satisfaction. Skill utilization did not play a role in terms of affecting locus of control, and the indirect effects of both job autonomy and skill utilization via job satisfaction were weak. This study suggests the importance of job autonomy in promoting the development of an employee's internal locus of control.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)102-108
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume89
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Internal-External Control
locus of control
autonomy
utilization
Job Satisfaction
job satisfaction
household income
Locus of control
Job skills
Job autonomy
employee
labor
Job satisfaction

Cite this

@article{fdda47b60c874738985759a46367d4c7,
title = "Developing agency through good work: Longitudinal effects of job autonomy and skill utilization on locus of control",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 Elsevier Inc. An internal locus of control has benefits for individuals across multiple life domains. Nevertheless, whether it is possible to enhance an individual's internal locus of control has rarely been considered. The authors propose that the presence of job autonomy and skill utilization in work can enhance internal locus of control, both directly and indirectly via job satisfaction. Three waves of data over a four-year period from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey (N = 3045) were analyzed. Results showed that job autonomy directly shaped internal locus of control over time, as did job satisfaction. Skill utilization did not play a role in terms of affecting locus of control, and the indirect effects of both job autonomy and skill utilization via job satisfaction were weak. This study suggests the importance of job autonomy in promoting the development of an employee's internal locus of control.",
author = "C.H. Wu and Mark Griffin and Sharon Parker",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.jvb.2015.05.004",
language = "English",
volume = "89",
pages = "102--108",
journal = "Journal of Vocational Behavior",
issn = "0001-8791",
publisher = "Academic Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developing agency through good work: Longitudinal effects of job autonomy and skill utilization on locus of control

AU - Wu, C.H.

AU - Griffin, Mark

AU - Parker, Sharon

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - © 2015 Elsevier Inc. An internal locus of control has benefits for individuals across multiple life domains. Nevertheless, whether it is possible to enhance an individual's internal locus of control has rarely been considered. The authors propose that the presence of job autonomy and skill utilization in work can enhance internal locus of control, both directly and indirectly via job satisfaction. Three waves of data over a four-year period from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey (N = 3045) were analyzed. Results showed that job autonomy directly shaped internal locus of control over time, as did job satisfaction. Skill utilization did not play a role in terms of affecting locus of control, and the indirect effects of both job autonomy and skill utilization via job satisfaction were weak. This study suggests the importance of job autonomy in promoting the development of an employee's internal locus of control.

AB - © 2015 Elsevier Inc. An internal locus of control has benefits for individuals across multiple life domains. Nevertheless, whether it is possible to enhance an individual's internal locus of control has rarely been considered. The authors propose that the presence of job autonomy and skill utilization in work can enhance internal locus of control, both directly and indirectly via job satisfaction. Three waves of data over a four-year period from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey (N = 3045) were analyzed. Results showed that job autonomy directly shaped internal locus of control over time, as did job satisfaction. Skill utilization did not play a role in terms of affecting locus of control, and the indirect effects of both job autonomy and skill utilization via job satisfaction were weak. This study suggests the importance of job autonomy in promoting the development of an employee's internal locus of control.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jvb.2015.05.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jvb.2015.05.004

M3 - Article

VL - 89

SP - 102

EP - 108

JO - Journal of Vocational Behavior

JF - Journal of Vocational Behavior

SN - 0001-8791

ER -