Developing a burn injury severity score (BISS): Adding age and total body surface area burned to the injury severity score (ISS) improves mortality concordance

J.T. Cassidy, Michael Phillips, Daniel Fatovich, Janine Duke, Dale Edgar, Fiona Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background There is limited research validating the injury severity score (ISS) in burns. We examined the concordance of ISS with burn mortality. We hypothesized that combining age and total body surface area (TBSA) burned to the ISS gives a more accurate mortality risk estimate. Methods Data from the Royal Perth Hospital Trauma Registry and the Royal Perth Hospital Burns Minimum Data Set were linked. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) measured concordance of ISS with mortality. Using logistic regression models with death as the dependent variable we developed a burn-specific injury severity score (BISS). Results There were 1344 burns with 24 (1.8%) deaths, median TBSA 5% (IQR 2-10), and median age 36 years (IQR 23-50). The results show ISS is a good predictor of death for burns when ISS ≤ 15 (OR 1.29, p = 0.02), but not for ISS 15 (ISS 16-24: OR 1.09, p = 0.81; ISS 25-49: OR 0.81, p = 0.19). Comparing the AUCs adjusted for age, gender and cause, ISS of 84% (95% CI 82-85%) and BISS of 95% (95% CI 92-98%), demonstrated superior performance of BISS as a mortality predictor for burns. Conclusion ISS is a poor predictor of death in severe burns. The BISS combines ISS with age and TBSA and performs significantly better than the ISS. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)805-813
JournalBurns
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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