Determining the true incidence of seasonal respiratory syncytial virus-confirmed hospitalizations in preterm and term infants in Western Australia

Mohinder Sarna, Amanuel Gebremedhin, Peter Richmond, Avram Levy, Kathryn Glass, Hannah C. Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus contributes to significant global infant morbidity and mortality. We applied a previously developed statistical prediction model incorporating pre-pandemic RSV testing data and hospital admission data to estimate infant RSV-hospitalizations by birth month and prematurity, focused on infants aged <1 year. The overall predicted RSV-hospitalization incidence rates in infants <6 months were 32.7/1,000 child-years (95 % CI: 31.8, 33.5) and 3.1/1,000 child-years (95 % CI: 3.0, 3.1) in infants aged 6-<12 months. Predicted RSV-hospitalization rates for infants aged <6 months were highest for infants born in April/May. Predicted rates for preterm infants born 29–32 weeks gestation were highest in March-May, whereas infants born >33 weeks had peak RSV-hospitalization rates from May-June, similar to late preterm or term births. RSV-hospitalization rates in the pre-pandemic era were highly seasonal, and seasonality varied with degree of prematurity. Accurate estimates of RSV-hospitalization in high-risk sub-groups are essential to understand preventable burden of RSV especially given the current prevention landscape.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5216-5220
Number of pages5
JournalVaccine
Volume41
Issue number36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Aug 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Determining the true incidence of seasonal respiratory syncytial virus-confirmed hospitalizations in preterm and term infants in Western Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this