Determining the effectiveness of resistance to subterranean clover mottle sobemovirus in different genotypes of subterranean clover in the field using the grazing animal as virus vector

D. G. Ferris, R. A.C. Jones, J. M. Wroth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effectiveness of resistance to subterranean clover mottle sobemovirus (SCMoV) previously identified in different genotypes of subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) inoculated with infective sap in the glasshouse, was tested in two field experiments which used the grazing animal as virus vector. Replicated plots each consisting of paired test rows of 20 different genotypes were used. Clover plants infected with SCMoV were transplanted in between the paired test rows and these acted as sources of the virus for spread by grazing sheep. Although used in different years at different sites with different virus isolates, the field exposure methodology employed produced consistent results. The genotypes each behaved similarly in both experiments as regards the relative extents of SCMoV infection that developed, levels ranging from 0-98%. The previously identified resistance in six 'highly resistant' and three 'partially resistant' cultivars was effective under field conditions. However, the 'partial resistance' in three others was overcome, cvs Green Range and Mt Barker developing levels of infection approaching those in 'susceptible' cultivars, while an intermediate infection level developed in cv. Karridale. The three cultivars in which partial resistance was not effective all belonged to ssp. subterraneum. In subterranean clover breeding programmes, field screening using the grazing animal as a vector is advisable to determine whether SCMoV resistance found by sap inoculation is still effective under field conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-315
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology
Volume128
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1996
Externally publishedYes

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