Determining prevalence and improving recognition and management of chronic wet cough in young Aboriginal children by caregivers and clinicians in the Kimberley

Pam Laird

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Chronic wet cough in children is the hallmark symptom of bronchiectasis, which has a high prevalence among Australian First Nations children. Bronchiectasis causes early mortality but can potentially be prevented if precursors such as protracted bacterial bronchitis are recognised and managed early. However, diagnosis is often delayed by years due to delayed recognition and management of chronic wet cough by families and clinicians. This thesis shows that protracted bacterial bronchitis is prevalent in First Nations children. Strategies to facilitate early recognition and management by both families and clinicians improves health seeking and health outcomes for First Nations children.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Schultz, Andre, Supervisor
  • Walker, Roz, Supervisor
  • Richmond, Peter, Supervisor
  • Chang, A., Supervisor, External person
Thesis sponsors
Award date26 Oct 2020
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2020

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