Detection of estrogen receptor a, carbonic anhydrase II and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase mRNAs in putative mononuclear osteoclast precursor cells of neonatal rats by fluorescence in situ hybridization

W.H. Huang, A.T.-T. Lau, L.L. Daniels, H. Fujii, U. Seydel, D.J. Wood, John Papadimitriou, M.H. Zheng

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Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that estrogen deficiency in women promotes the expansion of populations of bone marrow cells that differentiate into osteoclasts under the influence of osteotropic hormones and local factors. A progressive cytoplasmic accumulation of osteoclastic bone resorbing enzymes, such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), characterizes osteoclast differentiation. To evaluate the possibility that estrogen may have a direct effect on osteoclast precursor cells, we investigated the mRNA levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha), TRACP and CA II genes in neonatal rat bone imprints by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy. Morphological assessment of bone imprints has shown that the putative mononuclear osteoclast precursor cells (MOPC) display strongly basophilic cytoplasm and a low nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, while some of these cells possess pale-staining ruffled border regions similar to those observed in osteoclasts. Both CA II and TRACP mRNAs were detected in putative MOPC as well as multinuclear osteoclasts. The gene transcripts were mainly located in the cytoplasm of these cells. To determine whether these putative MOPC possess ER mRNA, a 637 base pair antisense ER riboprobe was used. The results indicated that MOPC which show TRACP reactivity express high levels of ER gene transcripts in their cytoplasm. In contrast, only a few multinuclear osteoclasts in the bone imprints possessed ER gene transcripts. Interestingly, the levels of ER mRNA in these multinuclear osteoclasts were very low compared with those in the putative MOPC. Treatment with RNase prior to hybridization resulted in a significant loss of signal in these cells. The results of these studies suggest that estrogen may have a direct role in modulating the recruitment of osteoclast precursor cells during osteoclastogenesis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-219
JournalJournal of Molecular Endocrinology
Volume20
Issue numberN/A
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998

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