Depression Among Nonfrail Old Men Is Associated With Reduced Physical Function and Functional Capacity After 9 Years Follow-up: The Health in Men Cohort Study

Osvaldo P. Almeida, Graeme J. Hankey, Bu B. Yeap, Jonathan Golledge, Keith D. Hill, Leon Flicker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Older adults with depression have increased risk of frailty and death. Objective To determine if history of depression hinders future physical and functional capacity. Design, setting, and participants Prospective longitudinal cohort study of 1148 men aged 70-87 years who were living in the Perth metropolitan community in 2001-2004 and completed a follow-up assessment of physical and functional capacity in 2011–2012. Main outcome and measures Outcomes were collected in 2011–2012 and included 4 measures of physical function (timed up-and-go, timed sit-to-stand, functional reach, and step test) and the assessment of basic (activities of daily living) and instrumental activities of daily living. We also collected information on depression and frailty [using the FRAIL (fatigue resistance ambulation illness, and loss of weight) scale] in 2001–2004 and 2011–2012. Frail men at the 2001–2004 were excluded from the analyses. Results Men with history of depression at the 2001–2004 assessment showed significantly worse performance than their counterparts in the timed sit-to-stand and step tests 9 years later. They also had approximately twice the risk of attaining the lowest decile of performance in both tests (analyses adjusted for age, education, and prevalent depressive symptoms). In addition, the adjusted risk ratio of impaired instrumental activities of daily living was 58% (95% confidence interval 15%, 116%) greater for men with than without history of past depression. These associations were particularly robust for men with current depression at the 2001–2004 assessment. Conclusions Nonfrail older men with history of current or past depression showed greater impairment of physical and functional capacity 9 years later. Older men with history of depression may benefit from regular monitoring of physical and occupational function and should be targeted by preventive trials designed to improve function and decrease frailty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-69
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume18
Issue number1
Early online date21 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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Men's Health
Cohort Studies
Depression
Activities of Daily Living
Exercise Test
Walking
Fatigue
Longitudinal Studies
Weight Loss
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals
Education

Cite this

@article{1d1071af96cc4ea98cc5253e2ecc93b5,
title = "Depression Among Nonfrail Old Men Is Associated With Reduced Physical Function and Functional Capacity After 9 Years Follow-up: The Health in Men Cohort Study",
abstract = "Background Older adults with depression have increased risk of frailty and death. Objective To determine if history of depression hinders future physical and functional capacity. Design, setting, and participants Prospective longitudinal cohort study of 1148 men aged 70-87 years who were living in the Perth metropolitan community in 2001-2004 and completed a follow-up assessment of physical and functional capacity in 2011–2012. Main outcome and measures Outcomes were collected in 2011–2012 and included 4 measures of physical function (timed up-and-go, timed sit-to-stand, functional reach, and step test) and the assessment of basic (activities of daily living) and instrumental activities of daily living. We also collected information on depression and frailty [using the FRAIL (fatigue resistance ambulation illness, and loss of weight) scale] in 2001–2004 and 2011–2012. Frail men at the 2001–2004 were excluded from the analyses. Results Men with history of depression at the 2001–2004 assessment showed significantly worse performance than their counterparts in the timed sit-to-stand and step tests 9 years later. They also had approximately twice the risk of attaining the lowest decile of performance in both tests (analyses adjusted for age, education, and prevalent depressive symptoms). In addition, the adjusted risk ratio of impaired instrumental activities of daily living was 58{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval 15{\%}, 116{\%}) greater for men with than without history of past depression. These associations were particularly robust for men with current depression at the 2001–2004 assessment. Conclusions Nonfrail older men with history of current or past depression showed greater impairment of physical and functional capacity 9 years later. Older men with history of depression may benefit from regular monitoring of physical and occupational function and should be targeted by preventive trials designed to improve function and decrease frailty.",
keywords = "activities of daily living, cohort study, Depression, epidemiology, frailty, physical function",
author = "Almeida, {Osvaldo P.} and Hankey, {Graeme J.} and Yeap, {Bu B.} and Jonathan Golledge and Hill, {Keith D.} and Leon Flicker",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jamda.2016.09.002",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "65--69",
journal = "Journal of the American Medical Directors Association",
issn = "1525-8610",
publisher = "Academic Press",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Depression Among Nonfrail Old Men Is Associated With Reduced Physical Function and Functional Capacity After 9 Years Follow-up

T2 - The Health in Men Cohort Study

AU - Almeida, Osvaldo P.

AU - Hankey, Graeme J.

AU - Yeap, Bu B.

AU - Golledge, Jonathan

AU - Hill, Keith D.

AU - Flicker, Leon

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background Older adults with depression have increased risk of frailty and death. Objective To determine if history of depression hinders future physical and functional capacity. Design, setting, and participants Prospective longitudinal cohort study of 1148 men aged 70-87 years who were living in the Perth metropolitan community in 2001-2004 and completed a follow-up assessment of physical and functional capacity in 2011–2012. Main outcome and measures Outcomes were collected in 2011–2012 and included 4 measures of physical function (timed up-and-go, timed sit-to-stand, functional reach, and step test) and the assessment of basic (activities of daily living) and instrumental activities of daily living. We also collected information on depression and frailty [using the FRAIL (fatigue resistance ambulation illness, and loss of weight) scale] in 2001–2004 and 2011–2012. Frail men at the 2001–2004 were excluded from the analyses. Results Men with history of depression at the 2001–2004 assessment showed significantly worse performance than their counterparts in the timed sit-to-stand and step tests 9 years later. They also had approximately twice the risk of attaining the lowest decile of performance in both tests (analyses adjusted for age, education, and prevalent depressive symptoms). In addition, the adjusted risk ratio of impaired instrumental activities of daily living was 58% (95% confidence interval 15%, 116%) greater for men with than without history of past depression. These associations were particularly robust for men with current depression at the 2001–2004 assessment. Conclusions Nonfrail older men with history of current or past depression showed greater impairment of physical and functional capacity 9 years later. Older men with history of depression may benefit from regular monitoring of physical and occupational function and should be targeted by preventive trials designed to improve function and decrease frailty.

AB - Background Older adults with depression have increased risk of frailty and death. Objective To determine if history of depression hinders future physical and functional capacity. Design, setting, and participants Prospective longitudinal cohort study of 1148 men aged 70-87 years who were living in the Perth metropolitan community in 2001-2004 and completed a follow-up assessment of physical and functional capacity in 2011–2012. Main outcome and measures Outcomes were collected in 2011–2012 and included 4 measures of physical function (timed up-and-go, timed sit-to-stand, functional reach, and step test) and the assessment of basic (activities of daily living) and instrumental activities of daily living. We also collected information on depression and frailty [using the FRAIL (fatigue resistance ambulation illness, and loss of weight) scale] in 2001–2004 and 2011–2012. Frail men at the 2001–2004 were excluded from the analyses. Results Men with history of depression at the 2001–2004 assessment showed significantly worse performance than their counterparts in the timed sit-to-stand and step tests 9 years later. They also had approximately twice the risk of attaining the lowest decile of performance in both tests (analyses adjusted for age, education, and prevalent depressive symptoms). In addition, the adjusted risk ratio of impaired instrumental activities of daily living was 58% (95% confidence interval 15%, 116%) greater for men with than without history of past depression. These associations were particularly robust for men with current depression at the 2001–2004 assessment. Conclusions Nonfrail older men with history of current or past depression showed greater impairment of physical and functional capacity 9 years later. Older men with history of depression may benefit from regular monitoring of physical and occupational function and should be targeted by preventive trials designed to improve function and decrease frailty.

KW - activities of daily living

KW - cohort study

KW - Depression

KW - epidemiology

KW - frailty

KW - physical function

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85006168524&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jamda.2016.09.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jamda.2016.09.002

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 65

EP - 69

JO - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

JF - Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

SN - 1525-8610

IS - 1

ER -