Defining T-cell immunity against rhinovirus species A and C

Cibele Marina Gaido

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    Abstract

    Rhinovirus (RV) species A and C play a fundamental role in the inception and exacerbations of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this relation are yet to be defined. This study identified T-cell epitopes in the RV viral protein that allowed for the in vitro characterisation of the adaptive immune-responses to RV-A and RV-C in a paediatric clinical cohort. Despite their biological differences, RV-A and RV-C stimulate similar !-cell responses in asthmatic and healthy children. Nonetheless, lower T-regulatory cell numbers found in asthmatics could explain their inability to control excessive immune responses to RV-infections, leading to airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma exacerbation.
    LanguageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    Award date10 Mar 2017
    StateUnpublished - 2017

    Fingerprint

    Rhinovirus
    Immunity
    T-Lymphocytes
    Respiratory Hypersensitivity
    Asthma
    T-Lymphocyte Epitopes
    Adaptive Immunity
    Viral Proteins
    Cell Count
    Pediatrics
    Infection

    Cite this

    @phdthesis{b41a195a2c71440580edd6915529101c,
    title = "Defining T-cell immunity against rhinovirus species A and C",
    abstract = "Rhinovirus (RV) species A and C play a fundamental role in the inception and exacerbations of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this relation are yet to be defined. This study identified T-cell epitopes in the RV viral protein that allowed for the in vitro characterisation of the adaptive immune-responses to RV-A and RV-C in a paediatric clinical cohort. Despite their biological differences, RV-A and RV-C stimulate similar !-cell responses in asthmatic and healthy children. Nonetheless, lower T-regulatory cell numbers found in asthmatics could explain their inability to control excessive immune responses to RV-infections, leading to airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma exacerbation.",
    keywords = "Rhinovirus, T-cell, Epitope mapping, T regulatory cells, RV-C, Asthma, HLA, Cell trace violet",
    author = "Gaido, {Cibele Marina}",
    year = "2017",
    language = "English",
    school = "The University of Western Australia",

    }

    Gaido, CM 2017, 'Defining T-cell immunity against rhinovirus species A and C', Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia.

    Defining T-cell immunity against rhinovirus species A and C. / Gaido, Cibele Marina.

    2017.

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    TY - THES

    T1 - Defining T-cell immunity against rhinovirus species A and C

    AU - Gaido,Cibele Marina

    PY - 2017

    Y1 - 2017

    N2 - Rhinovirus (RV) species A and C play a fundamental role in the inception and exacerbations of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this relation are yet to be defined. This study identified T-cell epitopes in the RV viral protein that allowed for the in vitro characterisation of the adaptive immune-responses to RV-A and RV-C in a paediatric clinical cohort. Despite their biological differences, RV-A and RV-C stimulate similar !-cell responses in asthmatic and healthy children. Nonetheless, lower T-regulatory cell numbers found in asthmatics could explain their inability to control excessive immune responses to RV-infections, leading to airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma exacerbation.

    AB - Rhinovirus (RV) species A and C play a fundamental role in the inception and exacerbations of asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying this relation are yet to be defined. This study identified T-cell epitopes in the RV viral protein that allowed for the in vitro characterisation of the adaptive immune-responses to RV-A and RV-C in a paediatric clinical cohort. Despite their biological differences, RV-A and RV-C stimulate similar !-cell responses in asthmatic and healthy children. Nonetheless, lower T-regulatory cell numbers found in asthmatics could explain their inability to control excessive immune responses to RV-infections, leading to airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma exacerbation.

    KW - Rhinovirus

    KW - T-cell

    KW - Epitope mapping

    KW - T regulatory cells

    KW - RV-C

    KW - Asthma

    KW - HLA

    KW - Cell trace violet

    M3 - Doctoral Thesis

    ER -