Defining Age-specific Relationships of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Rhinovirus Species in Hospitalized Children with Acute Wheeze

Stephen W.C. Oo, Siew Kim Khoo, Des W. Cox, Glenys Chidlow, Kimberley Franks, Franciska Prastanti, Yury A. Bochkov, Meredith L. Borland, Guicheng Zhang, James E. Gern, David W. Smith, Joelene A. Bizzintino, Ingrid A. Laing, Peter N. Le Souëf

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acute wheezing is one of the most common hospital presentations for young children. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus (RV) species A, B and the more recently described species C are implicated in the majority of these presentations. However, the relative importance and age-specificities of these viruses have not been defined. Hence, this study aimed to establish these relationships in a large cohort of prospectively recruited hospitalized children. Methods: The study cohort was 390 children 0-16 years of age presenting with acute wheezing to a children's emergency department, 96.4% being admitted. A nonwheezing control population of 190 was also recruited. Nasal samples were analyzed for viruses. Results: For the first 6 months of life, RSV was the dominant virus associated with wheezing (P < 0.001). From 6 months to 2 years, RSV, RV-A and RV-C were all common but none predominated. From 2 to 6 years, RV-C was the dominant virus detected (50-60% of cases), 2-3 times more common than RV-A and RSV, RSV decreasing to be absent from 4 to 7 years. RV-B was rare at all ages. RV-C was no longer dominant in children more than 10 years of age. Overall, RV-C was associated with lower mean oxygen saturation than any other virus (P < 0.001). Controls had no clear age distribution of viruses. Conclusion: This study establishes a clear profile of age specificity of virus infections causing moderate to severe wheezing in children: RSV as the dominant cause in the first 6 months and RV-C in preschool-age children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)873-879
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume40
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021

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