Cross-Cultural Interactions in the Roman Empire: Comparing East and West in the 2nd and 3rd Centuries CE

Doug Whyte

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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Abstract

The Roman Empire was one of the largest in the ancient world, and in both the acquisition and consolidation of its territories it fostered extensive migration. This high degree of mobility enabled a significant degree of interaction between different cultural groups as they came in contact with each other throughout the Empire. In this study we will compare cross-cultural interactions in the Hadrian’s Wall and Middle Euphrates frontier regions, in the 2nd and 3rd centuries CE. Our aim is to identify similarities and differences in how these interactions occurred, focusing on intermarriage and family formation, religious practices, and legal practices.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMasters
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Mallan, Christopher, Supervisor
  • O'Sullivan, Lara-Louisa, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date17 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2023

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