COVID-19 vaccination in haematology patients: an Australian and New Zealand consensus position statement

Georgia McCaughan, Pietro Di Ciaccio, Michelle Ananda-Rajah, Nicole Gilroy, Raina MacIntyre, Benjamin Teh, Robert Weinkove, Jennifer Curnow, Jeff Szer, Anoop K. Enjeti, David M. Ross, Stephen Mulligan, Judith Trotman, Michael Dickinson, Hang Quach, Phillip Choi, Mark N. Polizzotto, Constantine S. Tam, P. Joy Ho, Matthew KuGareth Gregory, Shane Gangatharan, Greg Hapgood, Tara Cochrane, Chan Cheah, Simon Gibbs, Andrew Wei, Anna Johnston, Matthew Greenwood, H. Miles Prince, Maya Latimer, Leanne Berkahn, Joel Wight, Tasman Armytage, Nada Hamad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Australia and New Zealand have achieved excellent community control of COVID-19 infection. In light of the imminent COVID-19 vaccination roll out in both countries, representatives from the Haematology Society of Australia and New Zealand and infectious diseases specialists have collaborated on this consensus position statement regarding COVID-19 vaccination in patients with haematological disorders. It is our recommendation that patients with haematological malignancies, and some benign haematological disorders, should have expedited access to high-efficacy COVID-19 vaccines, given that these patients are at high risk of morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 infection. Vaccination should not replace other public health measures in these patients, given that the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccination, specifically in patients with haematological malignancies, is not known. Given the limited available data, prospective collection of safety and efficacy data of COVID-19 vaccination in this patient group is a priority.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-768
Number of pages6
JournalInternal Medicine Journal
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

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