Country unwrapping landscape: Kuluntjarra World Map (The Nine Collaborations)

Jonathan Kimberley

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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Abstract

How can the (Western cultural) landscape paradigm in Australia reconfigure itself in collaboration with what Tasmanian writer puralia meenamatta (Jim Everett) has called the “fact-reality”1 of Aboriginal Country, through contemporary art practice? Country Unwrapping Landscape : Kuluntjarra World Map (The Nine Collaborations) (KWM9), a Master of Fine Arts (Research) thesis combining an exhibition and a written thesis. Country Unwrapping Landscape is the written component of the thesis (30,000 words including an exhibition exegesis). The exhibition / studio component of the thesis titled, Kuluntjarra World Map (The Nine Collaborations), includes nine major collaborative paintings. The thesis as a whole asks whether intercultural collaborative art practice might begin to recover what has been lost in translation between Western Landscape and Aboriginal Country. A critique of what I call Postlandscape is central to this discussion and argues for a new paradigm of landscape art in Australia. This new paradigm eschews the ambivalent 'between-space' of postlandscape for a more reciprocal, collaborative and unlimiting relationship that I introduce as, working exmodern. The collaborative nature of the studio component of this thesis is integral to my research question. KWM9 is a series of nine paintings made collaboratively by Jonathan Kimberley, Ngipi Ward, Pulpurru Davies, Nancy Carnegie, Manupa Butler, Norma Giles, Jodie Carnegie and Paul Carnegie (Kayili Artists) in Patjarr, Gibson Desert, Western Australia. It was undertaken over almost two years in Ngaanyatjarra Country in 2008/09. KWM9 is presented as one example of working exmodern.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMasters
Publication statusUnpublished - 2010

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