Counter intelligence: evaluating Wi-Fi tracking data for augmenting conventional public space–public life surveys

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Abstract

Advanced tracking technologies are considered by smart city advocates to have the potential to transform how we study cities. This paper tests, one dimension of these broader claims, through analysing the potential contribution that Wi-Fi tracking data of Wi-Fi users in the public realm can contribute to conventional public space–public life surveys. The conclusion is that while Wi-Fi tracking data can make important contributions in terms of counting people, mapping their stays and movements at a precinct scale and larger, it is at present, not a wholesale substitute for more traditional methods – particularly when applied on a site scale to the nuances of interactions between public life and spaces. In this respect is should be considered as augmenting such traditional methods, rather than replacing them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)134-144
Number of pages11
JournalAustralian Planner
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Jul 2017

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abstract = "Advanced tracking technologies are considered by smart city advocates to have the potential to transform how we study cities. This paper tests, one dimension of these broader claims, through analysing the potential contribution that Wi-Fi tracking data of Wi-Fi users in the public realm can contribute to conventional public space–public life surveys. The conclusion is that while Wi-Fi tracking data can make important contributions in terms of counting people, mapping their stays and movements at a precinct scale and larger, it is at present, not a wholesale substitute for more traditional methods – particularly when applied on a site scale to the nuances of interactions between public life and spaces. In this respect is should be considered as augmenting such traditional methods, rather than replacing them.",
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Counter intelligence : evaluating Wi-Fi tracking data for augmenting conventional public space–public life surveys. / Bolleter, Julian.

In: Australian Planner, Vol. 54, No. 2, 12.07.2017, p. 134-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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