Cost-effectiveness of low-dose colchicine in patients with chronic coronary disease in the netherlands

Aernoud T L Fiolet, Willem Keusters, Johan Blokzijl, S Mark Nidorf, John E Eikelboom, Charley A Budgeon, Jan G P Tijssen, Tjeerd Römer, Iris Westendorp, Jan Hein Cornel, Peter L Thompson, Geert W J Frederix, Arend Mosterd, G Ardine de Wit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

AIMS: Recent trials have shown that low-dose colchicine (0.5 mg once daily) reduces major cardiovascular events in patients with acute and chronic coronary syndromes. We aimed to estimate the cost-effectiveness of low-dose colchicine therapy in patients with chronic coronary disease when added to standard background therapy.

METHODS AND RESULTS: This Markov cohort cost-effectiveness model used estimates of therapy effectiveness, transition probabilities, costs and quality of life obtained from the Low-dose Colchicine 2 (LoDoCo2) trial, as well as meta-analyses and public sources. In this trial, Low-dose colchicine was added to standard of care and compared to placebo. The main outcomes were cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke and coronary revascularisation, quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), the cost per QALY gained (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio), and net monetary benefit. In the model, low-dose colchicine therapy yielded 0.04 additional QALYs compared with standard of care at an incremental cost of €455 from a societal perspective and €729 from a healthcare perspective, resulting in a cost per QALY gained of €12,176/QALY from a societal perspective and €19,499/QALY from a healthcare perspective. Net monetary benefit was €1,414 from a societal perspective and €1,140 from a healthcare perspective. Low-dose colchicine has a 96% and 94% chance of being cost effective, from respectively a societal and healthcare perspective when using a willingness to pay of €50,000/QALY. Net monetary benefit would decrease below zero when annual low-dose colchicine costs would exceed an annual cost of €221 per patient.

CONCLUSION: Adding low-dose colchicine to standard of care in patients with chronic coronary disease is cost-effective according to commonly accepted thresholds in Europe and Australia and compares favourably in cost-effectiveness to other drugs used in chronic coronary disease.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean heart journal. Quality of care & clinical outcomes
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Mar 2024

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