Coping, Negative Affectivity, and the Work Environment: Additive and Interactive Predictors of Mental Health

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Abstract

The present study tested the hypothesis that direct coping would moderate relations between work stress and mental health outcome, whereas suppression (a form of emotion-focused coping) would show an overall effect on outcome. Data on coping, perceived work demand and support, and affective symptoms were obtained from trainee teachers (N = 157). The results supported the hypothesis. Gender differences also were observed; men reported more use of suppression than did women. In addition, negative affectivity (NA) was examined as a confounding variable and as an index of reactivity in stress-outcome relations. NA acted to inflate associations between work perceptions and affective symptoms, but it was also a significant moderator variable; high NA subjects showed greater reactivity to work demand than did low NA subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)399-409
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1990
Externally publishedYes

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