Controls on shelf-margin architecture and sediment partitioning during a syn-rift to post-rift transition: Insights from the Barrow Group (Northern Carnarvon Basin, North West Shelf, Australia)

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Abstract

The Barrow Group was deposited in the Northern Carnarvon Basin from the latest Tithonian to the Late Valanginian. This moderately deep-water shelf-margin is composed of ~ 100–500 m high clinoforms that prograded during a syn-rift to post-rift transition. Integration of well data with extensive 2D and 3D seismic data was used to constrain the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group in seven 3rd order seismic sequences (calibrated to dinocyst zones) across four main depocentres. Five shelf-margin categories were recognized based on stratal stacking patterns, the trajectory styles and angles (Tse), and the progradation/aggradation ratios (Pse/Ase) that were interpreted in terms of rates of accommodation creation and sediment supply (A/S ratio). Following the uplift of the Southern Carnarvon Basin (sediment source), the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group developed in three stages. During the first stage (late syn-rift I; 148–143.5 Ma), the shelf-margin prograded in a period of tectonic quiescence with relatively limited subsidence. During the second stage (late syn-rift II; 143.5–138.2 Ma), the shelf-margin was affected by increasing rates of accommodation and high sediment supply, which reflects an active period of rifting triggering both tectonic subsidence in the basin, and active uplift in the hinterland. During the third stage (early post-rift I; 138.2–135.4 Ma), the uplift of the continental shelf, following continental break-up, provided a new local source of sediment supply to the Barrow Group that then developed as a passive margin. The Lower Barrow Group (late syn-rift I and II) mainly developed under supply-dominated conditions. However, lateral variations in subsidence regime and shifts in sediment supply led to significant variations in shelf-margin architecture along-strike, directly impacting sediment partitioning between the shelf and the deep-water areas. Flat shelf-edge trajectories were associated with sediment bypass and increase in bottomset thicknesses, whereas rising shelf-edge trajectories were linked with sediment storage on the shelf. In contrast, the Upper Barrow Group (early post-rift I) developed in low-supply conditions with slow thermal subsidence, reflecting the passive context of the margin at this time. The Barrow Group provides a unique example of how rift tectonics can control the stratigraphic architecture of a regressive margin and reciprocally, how studying shelf-margin architecture can help constraining the dynamics and timing of rifting around the break-up stage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)643-677
JournalEarth-Science Reviews
Volume177
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018

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partitioning
basin
sediment
subsidence
uplift
trajectory
shelf break
tectonics
rifting
deep water
continental breakup
Valanginian
Tithonian
depocenter
aggradation
progradation
bypass
passive margin
stacking
continental shelf

Cite this

@article{ed8e8863d01c43169af5e043beb52d15,
title = "Controls on shelf-margin architecture and sediment partitioning during a syn-rift to post-rift transition: Insights from the Barrow Group (Northern Carnarvon Basin, North West Shelf, Australia)",
abstract = "The Barrow Group was deposited in the Northern Carnarvon Basin from the latest Tithonian to the Late Valanginian. This moderately deep-water shelf-margin is composed of ~ 100–500 m high clinoforms that prograded during a syn-rift to post-rift transition. Integration of well data with extensive 2D and 3D seismic data was used to constrain the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group in seven 3rd order seismic sequences (calibrated to dinocyst zones) across four main depocentres. Five shelf-margin categories were recognized based on stratal stacking patterns, the trajectory styles and angles (Tse), and the progradation/aggradation ratios (Pse/Ase) that were interpreted in terms of rates of accommodation creation and sediment supply (A/S ratio). Following the uplift of the Southern Carnarvon Basin (sediment source), the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group developed in three stages. During the first stage (late syn-rift I; 148–143.5 Ma), the shelf-margin prograded in a period of tectonic quiescence with relatively limited subsidence. During the second stage (late syn-rift II; 143.5–138.2 Ma), the shelf-margin was affected by increasing rates of accommodation and high sediment supply, which reflects an active period of rifting triggering both tectonic subsidence in the basin, and active uplift in the hinterland. During the third stage (early post-rift I; 138.2–135.4 Ma), the uplift of the continental shelf, following continental break-up, provided a new local source of sediment supply to the Barrow Group that then developed as a passive margin. The Lower Barrow Group (late syn-rift I and II) mainly developed under supply-dominated conditions. However, lateral variations in subsidence regime and shifts in sediment supply led to significant variations in shelf-margin architecture along-strike, directly impacting sediment partitioning between the shelf and the deep-water areas. Flat shelf-edge trajectories were associated with sediment bypass and increase in bottomset thicknesses, whereas rising shelf-edge trajectories were linked with sediment storage on the shelf. In contrast, the Upper Barrow Group (early post-rift I) developed in low-supply conditions with slow thermal subsidence, reflecting the passive context of the margin at this time. The Barrow Group provides a unique example of how rift tectonics can control the stratigraphic architecture of a regressive margin and reciprocally, how studying shelf-margin architecture can help constraining the dynamics and timing of rifting around the break-up stage.",
keywords = "Barrow Group, Rift, North West Shelf, Subsidence, Sediment supply, Shelf-margin, Shelf-edge trajectory, Sediment partitioning",
author = "Victorien Paumard and Julien Bourget and Payenberg, {Tobias H} and R.B. Ainsworth and George, {Annette Dale} and S. Lang and H Posamentier and Daniel Peyrot",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.11.026",
language = "English",
volume = "177",
pages = "643--677",
journal = "Earth-Science Review",
issn = "0012-8252",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Controls on shelf-margin architecture and sediment partitioning during a syn-rift to post-rift transition: Insights from the Barrow Group (Northern Carnarvon Basin, North West Shelf, Australia)

AU - Paumard, Victorien

AU - Bourget, Julien

AU - Payenberg, Tobias H

AU - Ainsworth, R.B.

AU - George, Annette Dale

AU - Lang, S.

AU - Posamentier, H

AU - Peyrot, Daniel

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - The Barrow Group was deposited in the Northern Carnarvon Basin from the latest Tithonian to the Late Valanginian. This moderately deep-water shelf-margin is composed of ~ 100–500 m high clinoforms that prograded during a syn-rift to post-rift transition. Integration of well data with extensive 2D and 3D seismic data was used to constrain the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group in seven 3rd order seismic sequences (calibrated to dinocyst zones) across four main depocentres. Five shelf-margin categories were recognized based on stratal stacking patterns, the trajectory styles and angles (Tse), and the progradation/aggradation ratios (Pse/Ase) that were interpreted in terms of rates of accommodation creation and sediment supply (A/S ratio). Following the uplift of the Southern Carnarvon Basin (sediment source), the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group developed in three stages. During the first stage (late syn-rift I; 148–143.5 Ma), the shelf-margin prograded in a period of tectonic quiescence with relatively limited subsidence. During the second stage (late syn-rift II; 143.5–138.2 Ma), the shelf-margin was affected by increasing rates of accommodation and high sediment supply, which reflects an active period of rifting triggering both tectonic subsidence in the basin, and active uplift in the hinterland. During the third stage (early post-rift I; 138.2–135.4 Ma), the uplift of the continental shelf, following continental break-up, provided a new local source of sediment supply to the Barrow Group that then developed as a passive margin. The Lower Barrow Group (late syn-rift I and II) mainly developed under supply-dominated conditions. However, lateral variations in subsidence regime and shifts in sediment supply led to significant variations in shelf-margin architecture along-strike, directly impacting sediment partitioning between the shelf and the deep-water areas. Flat shelf-edge trajectories were associated with sediment bypass and increase in bottomset thicknesses, whereas rising shelf-edge trajectories were linked with sediment storage on the shelf. In contrast, the Upper Barrow Group (early post-rift I) developed in low-supply conditions with slow thermal subsidence, reflecting the passive context of the margin at this time. The Barrow Group provides a unique example of how rift tectonics can control the stratigraphic architecture of a regressive margin and reciprocally, how studying shelf-margin architecture can help constraining the dynamics and timing of rifting around the break-up stage.

AB - The Barrow Group was deposited in the Northern Carnarvon Basin from the latest Tithonian to the Late Valanginian. This moderately deep-water shelf-margin is composed of ~ 100–500 m high clinoforms that prograded during a syn-rift to post-rift transition. Integration of well data with extensive 2D and 3D seismic data was used to constrain the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group in seven 3rd order seismic sequences (calibrated to dinocyst zones) across four main depocentres. Five shelf-margin categories were recognized based on stratal stacking patterns, the trajectory styles and angles (Tse), and the progradation/aggradation ratios (Pse/Ase) that were interpreted in terms of rates of accommodation creation and sediment supply (A/S ratio). Following the uplift of the Southern Carnarvon Basin (sediment source), the stratigraphic evolution of the Barrow Group developed in three stages. During the first stage (late syn-rift I; 148–143.5 Ma), the shelf-margin prograded in a period of tectonic quiescence with relatively limited subsidence. During the second stage (late syn-rift II; 143.5–138.2 Ma), the shelf-margin was affected by increasing rates of accommodation and high sediment supply, which reflects an active period of rifting triggering both tectonic subsidence in the basin, and active uplift in the hinterland. During the third stage (early post-rift I; 138.2–135.4 Ma), the uplift of the continental shelf, following continental break-up, provided a new local source of sediment supply to the Barrow Group that then developed as a passive margin. The Lower Barrow Group (late syn-rift I and II) mainly developed under supply-dominated conditions. However, lateral variations in subsidence regime and shifts in sediment supply led to significant variations in shelf-margin architecture along-strike, directly impacting sediment partitioning between the shelf and the deep-water areas. Flat shelf-edge trajectories were associated with sediment bypass and increase in bottomset thicknesses, whereas rising shelf-edge trajectories were linked with sediment storage on the shelf. In contrast, the Upper Barrow Group (early post-rift I) developed in low-supply conditions with slow thermal subsidence, reflecting the passive context of the margin at this time. The Barrow Group provides a unique example of how rift tectonics can control the stratigraphic architecture of a regressive margin and reciprocally, how studying shelf-margin architecture can help constraining the dynamics and timing of rifting around the break-up stage.

KW - Barrow Group

KW - Rift

KW - North West Shelf

KW - Subsidence

KW - Sediment supply

KW - Shelf-margin

KW - Shelf-edge trajectory

KW - Sediment partitioning

U2 - 10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.11.026

DO - 10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.11.026

M3 - Article

VL - 177

SP - 643

EP - 677

JO - Earth-Science Review

JF - Earth-Science Review

SN - 0012-8252

ER -