Contribution of the built environment to inequity in loneliness by neighbourhood disadvantage in Australia

Tara Jamalishahni, Gavin Turrell, Karen Villanueva, Sarah Foster, Melanie Davern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disadvantaged areas have higher loneliness levels than advantaged areas, though studies rarely identify objective built environment determinants of loneliness by neighbourhood disadvantage. We studied the contribution of objective walkability components (residential density, street connectivity, and land use mix) and overall walkability in the relationship between neighbourhood disadvantage and loneliness using cross-sectional data from 3778 individuals aged 48-77 years old living in 200 neighbourhoods in Brisbane, Australia. Residential density only partly contributed to the observed inequity in loneliness across neighbourhood disadvantages, among all walkability components. Moreover, the overall walkability could not explain inequity in loneliness across neighbourhood disadvantages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1067-1080
Number of pages14
JournalCities and Health
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2022

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