Contrasting diversity and demographic signals in sympatric narrow-range endemic shrubs of the south-west Western Australian semi-arid zone

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    Abstract

    © 2016 The Linnean Society of London. Comparative studies of sympatric species that integrate both phylogeographical and population genetic approaches provide insight into how demographic events and life history traits shape adaptive potential and drive species persistence. Such studies are rare for species-rich and strongly structured environments, especially those of the southern hemisphere. For two sympatric, perennial shrubs of the south-west Western Australian semi-arid zone, Grevillea globosa and Mirbelia sp. Bursarioides, we assessed historical and contemporary genetic diversity and structure, demographic processes and ratios of pollen to seed dispersal. Phylogeographical structure was not detected and haplotype networks were star-like. Number of haplotypes, nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity, and allelic diversity were statistically significantly lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides. Levels of haplotype divergence and more contemporary genetic divergence and expected heterozygosity were lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides, but differences were not statistically significant. Both species exhibited signals of isolation by distance and low pollen to seed dispersal ratios (5.26:1 and 6.88:1). Grevillea globosa displayed signals of historical and contemporary demographic expansion. Results imply an important role for aspects of seed ecology that impact population demography, as well as direct dispersal and a significant contribution of seed dispersal to genetic connectivity in a semi-arid landscape.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)315-329
    JournalBiological Journal of the Linnean Society
    Volume118
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

    Fingerprint

    semiarid zones
    haplotypes
    shrub
    demographic statistics
    seed dispersal
    shrubs
    Grevillea
    Mirbelia
    pollen
    divergence
    genetic variation
    life history trait
    demography
    sympatry
    heterozygosity
    genetic structure
    population genetics
    Southern Hemisphere
    connectivity
    comparative study

    Cite this

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    title = "Contrasting diversity and demographic signals in sympatric narrow-range endemic shrubs of the south-west Western Australian semi-arid zone",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 The Linnean Society of London. Comparative studies of sympatric species that integrate both phylogeographical and population genetic approaches provide insight into how demographic events and life history traits shape adaptive potential and drive species persistence. Such studies are rare for species-rich and strongly structured environments, especially those of the southern hemisphere. For two sympatric, perennial shrubs of the south-west Western Australian semi-arid zone, Grevillea globosa and Mirbelia sp. Bursarioides, we assessed historical and contemporary genetic diversity and structure, demographic processes and ratios of pollen to seed dispersal. Phylogeographical structure was not detected and haplotype networks were star-like. Number of haplotypes, nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity, and allelic diversity were statistically significantly lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides. Levels of haplotype divergence and more contemporary genetic divergence and expected heterozygosity were lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides, but differences were not statistically significant. Both species exhibited signals of isolation by distance and low pollen to seed dispersal ratios (5.26:1 and 6.88:1). Grevillea globosa displayed signals of historical and contemporary demographic expansion. Results imply an important role for aspects of seed ecology that impact population demography, as well as direct dispersal and a significant contribution of seed dispersal to genetic connectivity in a semi-arid landscape.",
    author = "Melissa Millar and Margaret Byrne and David Coates and Dale Roberts",
    year = "2016",
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    doi = "10.1111/bij.12736",
    language = "English",
    volume = "118",
    pages = "315--329",
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    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
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    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Contrasting diversity and demographic signals in sympatric narrow-range endemic shrubs of the south-west Western Australian semi-arid zone

    AU - Millar, Melissa

    AU - Byrne, Margaret

    AU - Coates, David

    AU - Roberts, Dale

    PY - 2016/6

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    N2 - © 2016 The Linnean Society of London. Comparative studies of sympatric species that integrate both phylogeographical and population genetic approaches provide insight into how demographic events and life history traits shape adaptive potential and drive species persistence. Such studies are rare for species-rich and strongly structured environments, especially those of the southern hemisphere. For two sympatric, perennial shrubs of the south-west Western Australian semi-arid zone, Grevillea globosa and Mirbelia sp. Bursarioides, we assessed historical and contemporary genetic diversity and structure, demographic processes and ratios of pollen to seed dispersal. Phylogeographical structure was not detected and haplotype networks were star-like. Number of haplotypes, nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity, and allelic diversity were statistically significantly lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides. Levels of haplotype divergence and more contemporary genetic divergence and expected heterozygosity were lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides, but differences were not statistically significant. Both species exhibited signals of isolation by distance and low pollen to seed dispersal ratios (5.26:1 and 6.88:1). Grevillea globosa displayed signals of historical and contemporary demographic expansion. Results imply an important role for aspects of seed ecology that impact population demography, as well as direct dispersal and a significant contribution of seed dispersal to genetic connectivity in a semi-arid landscape.

    AB - © 2016 The Linnean Society of London. Comparative studies of sympatric species that integrate both phylogeographical and population genetic approaches provide insight into how demographic events and life history traits shape adaptive potential and drive species persistence. Such studies are rare for species-rich and strongly structured environments, especially those of the southern hemisphere. For two sympatric, perennial shrubs of the south-west Western Australian semi-arid zone, Grevillea globosa and Mirbelia sp. Bursarioides, we assessed historical and contemporary genetic diversity and structure, demographic processes and ratios of pollen to seed dispersal. Phylogeographical structure was not detected and haplotype networks were star-like. Number of haplotypes, nucleotide diversity, haplotype diversity, and allelic diversity were statistically significantly lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides. Levels of haplotype divergence and more contemporary genetic divergence and expected heterozygosity were lower for G. globosa than for M. sp. Bursarioides, but differences were not statistically significant. Both species exhibited signals of isolation by distance and low pollen to seed dispersal ratios (5.26:1 and 6.88:1). Grevillea globosa displayed signals of historical and contemporary demographic expansion. Results imply an important role for aspects of seed ecology that impact population demography, as well as direct dispersal and a significant contribution of seed dispersal to genetic connectivity in a semi-arid landscape.

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