Continuous glucose monitoring has an increasing role in pre-symptomatic type 1 diabetes: Advantages, limitations, and comparisons with laboratory-based testing

Kriti Joshi, Mark Harris, Andrew Cotterill, John M. Wentworth, Jennifer J. Couper, Aveni Haynes, Elizabeth A. Davis, Kate E. Lomax, Tony Huynh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is well-recognised as a continuum heralded by the development of islet autoantibodies, progression to islet autoimmunity causing beta cell destruction, culminating in insulin deficiency and clinical disease. Abnormalities of glucose homeostasis are known to exist well before the onset of typical symptoms. Laboratory-based tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) have been used to stage T1D and assess the risk of progression to clinical T1D. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can detect early glycaemic abnormalities and can therefore be used to monitor for metabolic deterioration in pre-symptomatic, islet autoantibody positive, at-risk individuals. Early identification of these children can not only reduce the risk of presentation with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), but also determine eligibility for prevention trials, which aim to prevent or delay progression to clinical T1D. Here, we describe the current state with regard to the use of the OGTT, HbA1c, fructosamine and glycated albumin in pre-symptomatic T1D. Using illustrative cases, we present our clinical experience with the use of CGM, and advocate for an increased role of this diabetes technology, for monitoring metabolic deterioration and disease progression in children with pre-symptomatic T1D.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107585
Pages (from-to)41-49
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume62
Issue number1
Early online date23 Jun 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2024

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Continuous glucose monitoring has an increasing role in pre-symptomatic type 1 diabetes: Advantages, limitations, and comparisons with laboratory-based testing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this