Consumer preferences and electricity pricing reform in Western Australia

Dev Tayal, Uwana Evers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Australia's electricity prices are high, driven by rising peak demand that is forcing significant levels of infrastructure investment. Compounding these factors is the lack of transparent price signals for consumers, with uniform pricing structures providing no incentive to change consumption behaviours. This research surveyed residential electricity consumers in Western Australia about their perceptions of solar, consumption behaviour, and electricity pricing structures. The results suggest that customers in Western Australia may be willing to change behaviour, reduce electricity usage, and be rewarded for use of renewable technologies, highlighting an opportunity for policies such as retail tariff reform to be further explored.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-124
Number of pages10
JournalUtilities Policy
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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electricity
pricing
reform
consumption behavior
incentive
customer
infrastructure
Western Australia
Consumption behavior
Consumer preferences
Electricity
Electricity pricing
lack
demand
price
Retail
Uniform pricing
Electricity price
Factors
Incentives

Cite this

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Consumer preferences and electricity pricing reform in Western Australia. / Tayal, Dev; Evers, Uwana.

In: Utilities Policy, Vol. 54, 01.10.2018, p. 115-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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