Conservation of the Threatened Species, Pulsatilla vulgaris Mill. (Pasqueflower), is Aided by Reproductive System and Polyploidy

Roberta Gargiulo, Gemma Worswick, Corinne Arnold, Lindsay J. Pike, Robyn S. Cowan, Kate A. Hardwick, Ted Chapman, Michael F. Fay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Population loss due to habitat disturbance is a major concern in biodiversity conservation. Here we investigate the genetic causes of the demographic decline observed in English populations of Pulsatilla vulgaris and the consequences for conservation. Using 10 nuclear microsatellite markers, we compare genetic variation in wild populations with restored and seed-regenerated populations (674 samples). Emergence of genetic structure and loss of allelic variation in natural populations are not as evident as expected from demographic trends. Restored populations show genetic variation comparable to their source populations and, in general, to the wild ones. Genetic homogeneity is observed in regeneration trials, although some alleles not captured in source populations are detected. We infer that polyploidy, longevity, and clonal reproduction have provided P. vulgaris with the standing genetic variation necessary to make the species resilient to the effects of demographic decline, suggesting that the use of multiple sources for reintroduction may be beneficial to mimic natural gene flow and the availability of multiple allele copies typical of polyploid species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)618-628
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Heredity
Volume110
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

Cite this

Gargiulo, Roberta ; Worswick, Gemma ; Arnold, Corinne ; Pike, Lindsay J. ; Cowan, Robyn S. ; Hardwick, Kate A. ; Chapman, Ted ; Fay, Michael F. / Conservation of the Threatened Species, Pulsatilla vulgaris Mill. (Pasqueflower), is Aided by Reproductive System and Polyploidy. In: Journal of Heredity. 2019 ; Vol. 110, No. 5. pp. 618-628.
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Conservation of the Threatened Species, Pulsatilla vulgaris Mill. (Pasqueflower), is Aided by Reproductive System and Polyploidy. / Gargiulo, Roberta; Worswick, Gemma; Arnold, Corinne; Pike, Lindsay J.; Cowan, Robyn S.; Hardwick, Kate A.; Chapman, Ted; Fay, Michael F.

In: Journal of Heredity, Vol. 110, No. 5, 07.2019, p. 618-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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