Confirmation of Identity: uncovering the working methods of an artist-scribe in a fifteenth-century Hebrew prayer book using spectral imaging techniques

Suzanne Wijsman, Haida Liang

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference presentation/ephemera

Abstract

Questions of identity about the artists of Hebrew illuminated manuscripts and the implications for interpretation of figural art they contain have long interested scholars. This research applied non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques to investigate aspects of the material production of the Oppenheimer Siddur, a 15th-century prayer book made for private family use. It revealed a close relationship between pigments used in text copying and artwork, confirming the hypothesis that the scribe was also the artist. This study shows that such non-invasive scientific techniques can contribute significant new information about Hebrew illuminated manuscript production, medieval Jewish artists and their working practices.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jul 2003
EventInternational Medieval Congress - University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Jul 20195 Jul 2019
https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/imc2019/

Conference

ConferenceInternational Medieval Congress
Abbreviated titleIMC
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLeeds
Period1/07/195/07/19
Internet address

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