Compulsive exercise as a mediator between clinical perfectionism and eating pathology

Sarah J. Egan, Kate Bodill, Hunna J. Watson, Emily Valentine, Chloe Shu, Martin S. Hagger

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to examine whether compulsive exercise mediates the relationship between clinical perfectionism and eating pathology, based on the cognitive behavioral model of compulsive exercise. Participants were 368 adults who participated regularly in sport/exercise and completed online measures of perfectionism, compulsive exercise and eating disorders. In support of the well-established link between perfectionism and eating disorders, clinical perfectionism predicted eating pathology both directly and indirectly mediated by compulsive exercise. In addition, there were also direct effects of clinical perfectionism on the avoidance/rule-driven behavior, weight control, and mood improvement subscales of the Compulsive Exercise Test (CET). There was a direct effect of the CET weight control subscale on eating pathology and a negative direct effect of the CET subscale mood improvement on eating pathology. Findings lend support to the cognitive behavioral model of compulsive exercise in which clinical perfectionism is conceptualized as related to eating disorders directly and indirectly through the mediation of compulsive exercise. Compulsive exercise was also found to have a direct effect on eating disorders. Compulsive exercise may be a symptom of eating pathology, rather than an antecedent, however causal inferences could not be established given the correlational design. Longitudinal research using cross-lagged panel designs to examine a bidirectional relationship between compulsive exercise and eating disorders is needed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)11-16
    Number of pages6
    JournalEating Behaviors
    Volume24
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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    Eating
    Pathology
    Exercise Test
    Weights and Measures
    Behavior Control
    Sports
    Perfectionism
    Feeding and Eating Disorders
    Research

    Cite this

    Egan, Sarah J. ; Bodill, Kate ; Watson, Hunna J. ; Valentine, Emily ; Shu, Chloe ; Hagger, Martin S. / Compulsive exercise as a mediator between clinical perfectionism and eating pathology. In: Eating Behaviors. 2017 ; Vol. 24. pp. 11-16.
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    Compulsive exercise as a mediator between clinical perfectionism and eating pathology. / Egan, Sarah J.; Bodill, Kate; Watson, Hunna J.; Valentine, Emily; Shu, Chloe; Hagger, Martin S.

    In: Eating Behaviors, Vol. 24, 01.01.2017, p. 11-16.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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