Comparing the potassium requirements of canola and wheat

R.F. Brennan, Michael Bolland

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    26 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Most sandy soils used for cropping in south-western Australia are now deficient in potassium (K) due to removal of K from soil in hay and grain, and pro. table grain yield responses to applied fertiliser K are commonly obtained for spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and canola (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L.). However, there are only limited data comparing the K requirements of these 2 species in the region. In a glasshouse experiment we compared the K requirements of wheat (cv. Westonia), conventional canola cv. Outback (cultivars of canola not produced by classical breeding techniques to be tolerant of specific herbicides), triazine-tolerant (TT) canola cvv. Pinnacle and Surpass 501, and imidazolinone-tolerant (IT) canola cv. Surpass 603. The following measures were used: yield of 54-day-old dried shoots and seed (grain) without added K, applied K required to produce 90% of the maximum yield of shoots and grain, K required to attain a K concentration in shoots of 30 g/kg, and K required to achieve a K content in shoots (K concentration multiplied by yield) of 40 mg/pot. We also determined for each species and cultivar the concentration of K in dried shoots that was related to 90% of the maximum grain yield, to estimate critical concentration in shoots below which K deficiency was likely to reduce grain production.All 4 canola cultivars produced similar results. Both canola and wheat produced negligible shoot yields and no grain when no K was applied. For each species and cultivar the amount of applied K required to produce 90% of the maximum yield was similar for shoots and grain, and was similar to 121 mg K/pot for the 4 canola cultivars and 102 mg K/pot for wheat, so similar to 19% more K was required for canola than for wheat. For each amount of K applied, the concentration of K in shoots was greater for canola than for wheat. The amount of applied K required to attain a K concentration of 30 g K/kg in shoots was similar to 96 mg K/pot for canola and 142 mg K/pot for wheat, so similar to 48% more K was required by wheat than by canola. The amount of K applied required to achieve a K content of 40 mg K/pot in shoots was similar to 46 mg K/pot for canola and 53 mg K/pot for wheat, so similar to 13% more applied K was required by wheat than by canola. The data suggest that canola roots were better able to obtain K from soil than wheat roots, but wheat used the K taken up more effectively than canola to produce shoots and grain. The concentration of K in dried shoots of 54-day-old plants that was related to 90% of the maximum dried shoot yield or grain was similar to 32 g/kg for canola and similar to 23 g/kg for wheat.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)359-366
    Journal Australian Journal of Agricultural Research
    Volume58
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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