Comparing responses to phosphorus of field pea (Pisum sativum), canola (rape, Brassica napus) and spring wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Michael Bolland, R.F. Brennan, P.F. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The phosphorus (P) requirements of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are well known for all soils in south-western Australia; but the P requirements of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) and canola (Brassica napus L.), which are grown in rotation with wheat on marginally acidic to alkaline soils in the region, are not known. In a glasshouse study, the P requirements of field pea and wheat were compared for 16 soils collected throughout the agricultural region. Ten of the 16 soils were also used to compare the P requirements of canola and wheat. The P was applied as powdered single superphosphate, and yield of dried shoots of 42-day-old plants was measured. The amount of P required to produce 90% of the maximum yield of dried shoots (PR90 values) was used to compare the P requirements of the species. To produce 90% of the maximum yield, field pea required less P than wheat in 5 soils, similar P in 2 soils, and more P in 9 soils. Canola required less P than wheat in all 10 soils. We conclude the P requirements of field pea or canola relative to wheat depend on a complex interaction between plant and soil, particularly for field pea relative to wheat. Per unit of applied P, the P concentration in dried shoots decreased in the order canola > wheat > field pea, indicating the order in which plant roots of the 3 species were able to access P from soil.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)645-657
JournalAustralian Journal of Experimental Agriculture
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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