Comparing Animation with Video For Teaching Communication Skills

Hayley Croft, Rohan Rasiah, Joyce Cooper, Keith Nesbitt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we describe a case study that compares the use of animation and video for teaching communication skills to pharmacy students. We present an appropriate framework outlining the key communication criteria that were used to develop a three part, patient-pharmacist communication scenario. This scenario was scripted, filmed in a community pharmacy, and edited into a six minute sequence before being converted to an equivalent animation sequence by using digital filters. Both the video and animation were compared in a usability trial using 37 students studying pharmacy. These students were divided into two groups, each experiencing either the video or animation sequence before being asked to provide subjective feedback of the usefulness of the approach for teaching communication. Both the video and animation group provided equivalent positive feedback about the approach. The two groups then experienced the alternative representation, either video or animation and were asked to nominate a preference. Both groups indicated a significant preference for the video presentation. It is recognized that the design and style of the animation may impact on the general validity of these outcomes and as such the paper also provides a detailed discussion of relevant design issues.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment
EditorsKaren Blackmore, Keith Nesbitt, Shamus P. Smith
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages1-10
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781450327909
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment - Newcastle, Australia
Duration: 2 Dec 20143 Dec 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment - IE2014

Conference

Conference2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment
CountryAustralia
CityNewcastle
Period2/12/143/12/14

Fingerprint

Animation
Teaching
Communication
Students
Feedback
Digital filters

Cite this

Croft, H., Rasiah, R., Cooper, J., & Nesbitt, K. (2014). Comparing Animation with Video For Teaching Communication Skills. In K. Blackmore, K. Nesbitt, & S. P. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment (pp. 1-10). (Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment - IE2014). USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). https://doi.org/10.1145/2677758.2677777
Croft, Hayley ; Rasiah, Rohan ; Cooper, Joyce ; Nesbitt, Keith. / Comparing Animation with Video For Teaching Communication Skills. Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment. editor / Karen Blackmore ; Keith Nesbitt ; Shamus P. Smith. USA : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014. pp. 1-10 (Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment - IE2014).
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Croft, H, Rasiah, R, Cooper, J & Nesbitt, K 2014, Comparing Animation with Video For Teaching Communication Skills. in K Blackmore, K Nesbitt & SP Smith (eds), Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment. Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment - IE2014, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), USA, pp. 1-10, 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment, Newcastle, Australia, 2/12/14. https://doi.org/10.1145/2677758.2677777

Comparing Animation with Video For Teaching Communication Skills. / Croft, Hayley; Rasiah, Rohan; Cooper, Joyce; Nesbitt, Keith.

Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment. ed. / Karen Blackmore; Keith Nesbitt; Shamus P. Smith. USA : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014. p. 1-10 (Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment - IE2014).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

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Croft H, Rasiah R, Cooper J, Nesbitt K. Comparing Animation with Video For Teaching Communication Skills. In Blackmore K, Nesbitt K, Smith SP, editors, Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment. USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). 2014. p. 1-10. (Proceedings of the 2014 Conference on Interactive Entertainment - IE2014). https://doi.org/10.1145/2677758.2677777