Comment on: Svatos, K.B.W. (2018). “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems” by Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res. 26, 5386–5392 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-0846-9

Grant Douglas, Andrew Rate, Miquel Lurling

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

INTRODUCTION
The application of geoengineering materials for the management of eutrophication of aquatic systems has been a burgeoning field over the past decade (e.g. Mackay et al. 2014; Spears et al. 2014). Aluminium (Al)- and lanthanum (La)-based materials are currently considered the most effective means for the removal of P as part of the targeted reduction of excess nutrients in eutrophic systems (Copetti et al. 2016; Douglas et al. 2008, Douglas 2010; Gibbs et al. 2011; Lurling et al. 2016; Smolders et al. 2006;Waajen et al. 2016a,
2016b). The relative performance of numerous materials, particularly P-sorbents, in freshwater environments has been extensively examined. Efficiency and effectiveness aspects in the use of these materials for eutrophication control have been reported on by Copetti et al. (2016); Douglas et al. (2016); Mucci et al. (2019) and Spears et al. (2013a). Ecosystem aspects have been examined in Copetti et al. (2016); social elements are discussed in Spears et al. (2013b), and the economics of their deployment examined by Hamilton et al. (2013).
In a recent article in this journal, Svatos (2018) asserts that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”. We argue here that the data presented by Svatos (2018) does not support such a categorical statement. The concept of “decline” in this work is poorly defined and certainly not quantified. Furthermore, we show that this work
misinterprets much of the extant data. It is undoubtedly true that “manufactures’ (sic) claims” need to be examined, but to do that, they also need to be accurately
described and the experimental tests be germane to the claims. We will demonstrate here that the central tenet of this work is not supported by the content of this publication. The numerous errors and misinterpretations
in Svatos (2018) which we document here collectively undermine the arguments. In this comment, we focus on the interpretation made in relation to lanthanum-modified bentonite (LMB) as an example for all of the aluminosilicate materials evaluated.
Lanthanum-modified bentonite has to date been the subject of approaching 100 peer-reviewed publications that have examined aspects as diverse as efficacy, phosphate uptake, flocculation, macroinvertebrates and ecotoxicity across a range of predominantly freshwater systems (e.g. Copetti et al. 2016; Hongbin et al. 2018; Waajen et al. 2016a, 2016b, 2017). We will draw on this canon of independent, peer-reviewed information as supporting evidence as required to refute the contention of Svatos (2018) that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5386-5392
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume26
Publication statusPublished - 19 Nov 2019

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Lanthanum
Silicates
Eutrophication
Bentonite
Desorption
desorption
Phosphates
silicate
phosphate
Fresh Water
Flocculation
bentonite
eutrophication
Aluminum
Ecosystem
Publications
Economics
freshwater environment
Aluminosilicates
aluminosilicate

Cite this

@article{069cc80f1c8343cbbe5015b4653da8e4,
title = "Comment on: Svatos, K.B.W. (2018). “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems” by Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res. 26, 5386–5392 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-0846-9",
abstract = "INTRODUCTIONThe application of geoengineering materials for the management of eutrophication of aquatic systems has been a burgeoning field over the past decade (e.g. Mackay et al. 2014; Spears et al. 2014). Aluminium (Al)- and lanthanum (La)-based materials are currently considered the most effective means for the removal of P as part of the targeted reduction of excess nutrients in eutrophic systems (Copetti et al. 2016; Douglas et al. 2008, Douglas 2010; Gibbs et al. 2011; Lurling et al. 2016; Smolders et al. 2006;Waajen et al. 2016a,2016b). The relative performance of numerous materials, particularly P-sorbents, in freshwater environments has been extensively examined. Efficiency and effectiveness aspects in the use of these materials for eutrophication control have been reported on by Copetti et al. (2016); Douglas et al. (2016); Mucci et al. (2019) and Spears et al. (2013a). Ecosystem aspects have been examined in Copetti et al. (2016); social elements are discussed in Spears et al. (2013b), and the economics of their deployment examined by Hamilton et al. (2013).In a recent article in this journal, Svatos (2018) asserts that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”. We argue here that the data presented by Svatos (2018) does not support such a categorical statement. The concept of “decline” in this work is poorly defined and certainly not quantified. Furthermore, we show that this workmisinterprets much of the extant data. It is undoubtedly true that “manufactures’ (sic) claims” need to be examined, but to do that, they also need to be accuratelydescribed and the experimental tests be germane to the claims. We will demonstrate here that the central tenet of this work is not supported by the content of this publication. The numerous errors and misinterpretationsin Svatos (2018) which we document here collectively undermine the arguments. In this comment, we focus on the interpretation made in relation to lanthanum-modified bentonite (LMB) as an example for all of the aluminosilicate materials evaluated.Lanthanum-modified bentonite has to date been the subject of approaching 100 peer-reviewed publications that have examined aspects as diverse as efficacy, phosphate uptake, flocculation, macroinvertebrates and ecotoxicity across a range of predominantly freshwater systems (e.g. Copetti et al. 2016; Hongbin et al. 2018; Waajen et al. 2016a, 2016b, 2017). We will draw on this canon of independent, peer-reviewed information as supporting evidence as required to refute the contention of Svatos (2018) that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”.",
author = "Grant Douglas and Andrew Rate and Miquel Lurling",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "19",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "5386--5392",
journal = "Environmental Science and Pollution Research",
issn = "0944-1344",
publisher = "Springer Science + Business Media",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comment on: Svatos, K.B.W. (2018). “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems” by Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res. 26, 5386–5392 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-0846-9

AU - Douglas, Grant

AU - Rate, Andrew

AU - Lurling, Miquel

PY - 2019/11/19

Y1 - 2019/11/19

N2 - INTRODUCTIONThe application of geoengineering materials for the management of eutrophication of aquatic systems has been a burgeoning field over the past decade (e.g. Mackay et al. 2014; Spears et al. 2014). Aluminium (Al)- and lanthanum (La)-based materials are currently considered the most effective means for the removal of P as part of the targeted reduction of excess nutrients in eutrophic systems (Copetti et al. 2016; Douglas et al. 2008, Douglas 2010; Gibbs et al. 2011; Lurling et al. 2016; Smolders et al. 2006;Waajen et al. 2016a,2016b). The relative performance of numerous materials, particularly P-sorbents, in freshwater environments has been extensively examined. Efficiency and effectiveness aspects in the use of these materials for eutrophication control have been reported on by Copetti et al. (2016); Douglas et al. (2016); Mucci et al. (2019) and Spears et al. (2013a). Ecosystem aspects have been examined in Copetti et al. (2016); social elements are discussed in Spears et al. (2013b), and the economics of their deployment examined by Hamilton et al. (2013).In a recent article in this journal, Svatos (2018) asserts that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”. We argue here that the data presented by Svatos (2018) does not support such a categorical statement. The concept of “decline” in this work is poorly defined and certainly not quantified. Furthermore, we show that this workmisinterprets much of the extant data. It is undoubtedly true that “manufactures’ (sic) claims” need to be examined, but to do that, they also need to be accuratelydescribed and the experimental tests be germane to the claims. We will demonstrate here that the central tenet of this work is not supported by the content of this publication. The numerous errors and misinterpretationsin Svatos (2018) which we document here collectively undermine the arguments. In this comment, we focus on the interpretation made in relation to lanthanum-modified bentonite (LMB) as an example for all of the aluminosilicate materials evaluated.Lanthanum-modified bentonite has to date been the subject of approaching 100 peer-reviewed publications that have examined aspects as diverse as efficacy, phosphate uptake, flocculation, macroinvertebrates and ecotoxicity across a range of predominantly freshwater systems (e.g. Copetti et al. 2016; Hongbin et al. 2018; Waajen et al. 2016a, 2016b, 2017). We will draw on this canon of independent, peer-reviewed information as supporting evidence as required to refute the contention of Svatos (2018) that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”.

AB - INTRODUCTIONThe application of geoengineering materials for the management of eutrophication of aquatic systems has been a burgeoning field over the past decade (e.g. Mackay et al. 2014; Spears et al. 2014). Aluminium (Al)- and lanthanum (La)-based materials are currently considered the most effective means for the removal of P as part of the targeted reduction of excess nutrients in eutrophic systems (Copetti et al. 2016; Douglas et al. 2008, Douglas 2010; Gibbs et al. 2011; Lurling et al. 2016; Smolders et al. 2006;Waajen et al. 2016a,2016b). The relative performance of numerous materials, particularly P-sorbents, in freshwater environments has been extensively examined. Efficiency and effectiveness aspects in the use of these materials for eutrophication control have been reported on by Copetti et al. (2016); Douglas et al. (2016); Mucci et al. (2019) and Spears et al. (2013a). Ecosystem aspects have been examined in Copetti et al. (2016); social elements are discussed in Spears et al. (2013b), and the economics of their deployment examined by Hamilton et al. (2013).In a recent article in this journal, Svatos (2018) asserts that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”. We argue here that the data presented by Svatos (2018) does not support such a categorical statement. The concept of “decline” in this work is poorly defined and certainly not quantified. Furthermore, we show that this workmisinterprets much of the extant data. It is undoubtedly true that “manufactures’ (sic) claims” need to be examined, but to do that, they also need to be accuratelydescribed and the experimental tests be germane to the claims. We will demonstrate here that the central tenet of this work is not supported by the content of this publication. The numerous errors and misinterpretationsin Svatos (2018) which we document here collectively undermine the arguments. In this comment, we focus on the interpretation made in relation to lanthanum-modified bentonite (LMB) as an example for all of the aluminosilicate materials evaluated.Lanthanum-modified bentonite has to date been the subject of approaching 100 peer-reviewed publications that have examined aspects as diverse as efficacy, phosphate uptake, flocculation, macroinvertebrates and ecotoxicity across a range of predominantly freshwater systems (e.g. Copetti et al. 2016; Hongbin et al. 2018; Waajen et al. 2016a, 2016b, 2017). We will draw on this canon of independent, peer-reviewed information as supporting evidence as required to refute the contention of Svatos (2018) that “Commercial silicate phosphate sequestration and desorption leads to a gradual decline of aquatic systems”.

UR - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-07103-9

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 26

SP - 5386

EP - 5392

JO - Environmental Science and Pollution Research

JF - Environmental Science and Pollution Research

SN - 0944-1344

ER -