Collaboration, contextualisation and communication using new media: The use of creative podcasting to promote deep learning of content in an undergraduate science unit

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

New media, enabled by digital technologies, are beginning to play a key role in education and can be linked with contemporary learner-centred approaches where students learn through active engagement with content and with peers. This paper describes the implementation of a creative podcasting task into an introductory chemistry course. By foregrounding student collaboration, contextualisation of content, and the use of new media, it was designed to promote a deep approach to the learning of content, as well as enhancing science communication skills, and generally improving motivation.

Students in a first-year chemistry course worked in groups of three to create a three minute podcast exploring one of two set chemical concepts, ‘acids and bases’ or ‘oxidation and reduction’, which was then shared with their peers. Many groups displayed considerable skill and creativity in communicating their messages. Student feedback was positive enough to recommend use of this type of assessment in other large science classes. The assignment required minimal effort on the part of the course coordinator and so was an efficient use of limited teaching resources to provide an engaging learning opportunity for students. The task was also found to have a positive effect on learning outcomes, increasing students’ understanding of content material by encouraging a deep learning approach.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
EventCom Scie Conference - Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 30 Oct 201331 Oct 2013

Conference

ConferenceCom Scie Conference
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period30/10/1331/10/13

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Collaboration, contextualisation and communication using new media: The use of creative podcasting to promote deep learning of content in an undergraduate science unit'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this