Coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) study

Maria A. Karalexi, Nick Dessypris, Jacqueline Clavel, Catherine Metayer, Friederike Erdmann, Laurent Orsi, Alice Y. Kang, Joachim Schüz, Audrey Bonaventure, Kathryn R. Greenop, Elizabeth Milne, Eleni Th Petridou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Dietary habits during pregnancy have been inconsistently linked to childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML), given the putative intrauterine onset of the disease as a result of triggering events during the critical period of fetal hematopoiesis. We investigated the potential association of maternal coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy with childhood AML risk, pooling primary data from eight case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Methods: Information on coffee and/or tea consumption was available for 444 cases and 1255 age- and sex-matched controls, on coffee consumption for 318 cases and 971 controls and on tea consumption for 388 cases and 932 controls. Categories for cups of daily coffee/tea consumption were created in order to explore potential dose-response associations. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results: Associations were found neither in the analysis on coffee or tea nor in the analysis on coffee only consumption (any versus no). A positive association with increasing coffee intake was observed (>1 cup per day; OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.03–1.92, increment of one cup per day; OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.01–1.39). No associations were observed with tea consumption. Interaction analyses showed non-significant associations between coffee/tea and smoking. Hyperdiploidy was inversely associated with tea consumption, with other cytogenetic markers having no association with coffee/tea. Conclusion: Given the widespread consumption of caffeinated beverages among pregnant women, our finding is of important public health relevance, suggesting adverse effects of maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy in the offspring.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101581
JournalCancer Epidemiology
Volume62
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

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Coffee
Tea
Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Leukemia
Pregnancy
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Mothers
Polyploidy
Beverages
Hematopoiesis
Feeding Behavior
Cytogenetics
Meta-Analysis
Case-Control Studies
Pregnant Women
Public Health
Logistic Models
Smoking

Cite this

Karalexi, Maria A. ; Dessypris, Nick ; Clavel, Jacqueline ; Metayer, Catherine ; Erdmann, Friederike ; Orsi, Laurent ; Kang, Alice Y. ; Schüz, Joachim ; Bonaventure, Audrey ; Greenop, Kathryn R. ; Milne, Elizabeth ; Petridou, Eleni Th. / Coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia : A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) study. In: Cancer Epidemiology. 2019 ; Vol. 62.
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title = "Coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) study",
abstract = "Background: Dietary habits during pregnancy have been inconsistently linked to childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML), given the putative intrauterine onset of the disease as a result of triggering events during the critical period of fetal hematopoiesis. We investigated the potential association of maternal coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy with childhood AML risk, pooling primary data from eight case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Methods: Information on coffee and/or tea consumption was available for 444 cases and 1255 age- and sex-matched controls, on coffee consumption for 318 cases and 971 controls and on tea consumption for 388 cases and 932 controls. Categories for cups of daily coffee/tea consumption were created in order to explore potential dose-response associations. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results: Associations were found neither in the analysis on coffee or tea nor in the analysis on coffee only consumption (any versus no). A positive association with increasing coffee intake was observed (>1 cup per day; OR: 1.40, 95{\%} CI: 1.03–1.92, increment of one cup per day; OR: 1.18, 95{\%} CI: 1.01–1.39). No associations were observed with tea consumption. Interaction analyses showed non-significant associations between coffee/tea and smoking. Hyperdiploidy was inversely associated with tea consumption, with other cytogenetic markers having no association with coffee/tea. Conclusion: Given the widespread consumption of caffeinated beverages among pregnant women, our finding is of important public health relevance, suggesting adverse effects of maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy in the offspring.",
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author = "Karalexi, {Maria A.} and Nick Dessypris and Jacqueline Clavel and Catherine Metayer and Friederike Erdmann and Laurent Orsi and Kang, {Alice Y.} and Joachim Sch{\"u}z and Audrey Bonaventure and Greenop, {Kathryn R.} and Elizabeth Milne and Petridou, {Eleni Th}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
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doi = "10.1016/j.canep.2019.101581",
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Karalexi, MA, Dessypris, N, Clavel, J, Metayer, C, Erdmann, F, Orsi, L, Kang, AY, Schüz, J, Bonaventure, A, Greenop, KR, Milne, E & Petridou, ET 2019, 'Coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) study' Cancer Epidemiology, vol. 62, 101581. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2019.101581

Coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia : A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) study. / Karalexi, Maria A.; Dessypris, Nick; Clavel, Jacqueline; Metayer, Catherine; Erdmann, Friederike; Orsi, Laurent; Kang, Alice Y.; Schüz, Joachim; Bonaventure, Audrey; Greenop, Kathryn R.; Milne, Elizabeth; Petridou, Eleni Th.

In: Cancer Epidemiology, Vol. 62, 101581, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

T2 - A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) study

AU - Karalexi, Maria A.

AU - Dessypris, Nick

AU - Clavel, Jacqueline

AU - Metayer, Catherine

AU - Erdmann, Friederike

AU - Orsi, Laurent

AU - Kang, Alice Y.

AU - Schüz, Joachim

AU - Bonaventure, Audrey

AU - Greenop, Kathryn R.

AU - Milne, Elizabeth

AU - Petridou, Eleni Th

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Background: Dietary habits during pregnancy have been inconsistently linked to childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML), given the putative intrauterine onset of the disease as a result of triggering events during the critical period of fetal hematopoiesis. We investigated the potential association of maternal coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy with childhood AML risk, pooling primary data from eight case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Methods: Information on coffee and/or tea consumption was available for 444 cases and 1255 age- and sex-matched controls, on coffee consumption for 318 cases and 971 controls and on tea consumption for 388 cases and 932 controls. Categories for cups of daily coffee/tea consumption were created in order to explore potential dose-response associations. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results: Associations were found neither in the analysis on coffee or tea nor in the analysis on coffee only consumption (any versus no). A positive association with increasing coffee intake was observed (>1 cup per day; OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.03–1.92, increment of one cup per day; OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.01–1.39). No associations were observed with tea consumption. Interaction analyses showed non-significant associations between coffee/tea and smoking. Hyperdiploidy was inversely associated with tea consumption, with other cytogenetic markers having no association with coffee/tea. Conclusion: Given the widespread consumption of caffeinated beverages among pregnant women, our finding is of important public health relevance, suggesting adverse effects of maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy in the offspring.

AB - Background: Dietary habits during pregnancy have been inconsistently linked to childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML), given the putative intrauterine onset of the disease as a result of triggering events during the critical period of fetal hematopoiesis. We investigated the potential association of maternal coffee and tea consumption during pregnancy with childhood AML risk, pooling primary data from eight case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Methods: Information on coffee and/or tea consumption was available for 444 cases and 1255 age- and sex-matched controls, on coffee consumption for 318 cases and 971 controls and on tea consumption for 388 cases and 932 controls. Categories for cups of daily coffee/tea consumption were created in order to explore potential dose-response associations. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results: Associations were found neither in the analysis on coffee or tea nor in the analysis on coffee only consumption (any versus no). A positive association with increasing coffee intake was observed (>1 cup per day; OR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.03–1.92, increment of one cup per day; OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.01–1.39). No associations were observed with tea consumption. Interaction analyses showed non-significant associations between coffee/tea and smoking. Hyperdiploidy was inversely associated with tea consumption, with other cytogenetic markers having no association with coffee/tea. Conclusion: Given the widespread consumption of caffeinated beverages among pregnant women, our finding is of important public health relevance, suggesting adverse effects of maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy in the offspring.

KW - Acute myeloid leukemia

KW - Childhood

KW - Coffee

KW - Maternal consumption

KW - Pooled analysis

KW - Tea

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U2 - 10.1016/j.canep.2019.101581

DO - 10.1016/j.canep.2019.101581

M3 - Article

VL - 62

JO - Cancer Detection and Prevention

JF - Cancer Detection and Prevention

SN - 0361-090X

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ER -