Clinical validation of automated audiometry with continuous noise-monitoring in a clinically heterogeneous population outside a sound-treated environment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.Objective: Examine the accuracy of automated audiometry in a clinically heterogeneous population of adults using the KUDUwave automated audiometer. Design: Prospective accuracy study. Manual audiometry was performed in a sound-treated room and automated audiometry was not conducted in a sound-treated environment. Study sample: 42 consecutively recruited participants from a tertiary otolaryngology department in Western Australia. Results: Absolute mean differences ranged between 5.12–9.68 dB (air-conduction) and 8.26–15 dB (bone-conduction). A total of 86.5% of manual and automated 4FAs were within 10 dB (i.e. ±5 dB); 94.8% were within 15 dB. However, there were significant (p <0.05) differences between automated and manual audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (air-conduction) and 500 and 1000 Hz (bone-conduction). The effect of age (≥55 years) on accuracy (p = 0.014) was not significant on linear regression (p > 0.05; R2=0.11). The presence of a hearing loss (better ear ≥26 dB) did not significantly affect accuracy (p = 0.604; air-conduction), (p = 0.218; bone-conduction). Conclusions: This study provides clinical validation of automated audiometry using the KUDUwave in a clinically heterogeneous population, without the use of a sound-treated environment. Whilst threshold variations were statistically significant, future research is needed to ascertain the clinical significance of such variation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-513
JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
Volume55
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

audiometry
Audiometry
Noise
Bone Conduction
monitoring
Audiology
Population
Air
air
Western Australia
Otolaryngology
Hearing Loss
Ear
Prospective Studies
Monitoring
Sound
Society

Cite this

@article{c1995424d7b24c259a7464d7fa9ccd03,
title = "Clinical validation of automated audiometry with continuous noise-monitoring in a clinically heterogeneous population outside a sound-treated environment",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.Objective: Examine the accuracy of automated audiometry in a clinically heterogeneous population of adults using the KUDUwave automated audiometer. Design: Prospective accuracy study. Manual audiometry was performed in a sound-treated room and automated audiometry was not conducted in a sound-treated environment. Study sample: 42 consecutively recruited participants from a tertiary otolaryngology department in Western Australia. Results: Absolute mean differences ranged between 5.12–9.68 dB (air-conduction) and 8.26–15 dB (bone-conduction). A total of 86.5{\%} of manual and automated 4FAs were within 10 dB (i.e. ±5 dB); 94.8{\%} were within 15 dB. However, there were significant (p <0.05) differences between automated and manual audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (air-conduction) and 500 and 1000 Hz (bone-conduction). The effect of age (≥55 years) on accuracy (p = 0.014) was not significant on linear regression (p > 0.05; R2=0.11). The presence of a hearing loss (better ear ≥26 dB) did not significantly affect accuracy (p = 0.604; air-conduction), (p = 0.218; bone-conduction). Conclusions: This study provides clinical validation of automated audiometry using the KUDUwave in a clinically heterogeneous population, without the use of a sound-treated environment. Whilst threshold variations were statistically significant, future research is needed to ascertain the clinical significance of such variation.",
author = "Christopher Brennan-Jones and Robert Eikelboom and Swanepoel, {De Wet} and Peter Friedland and Marcus Atlas",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1080/14992027.2016.1178858",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "507--513",
journal = "International Journal of Audiology",
issn = "1499-2027",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare USA",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical validation of automated audiometry with continuous noise-monitoring in a clinically heterogeneous population outside a sound-treated environment

AU - Brennan-Jones, Christopher

AU - Eikelboom, Robert

AU - Swanepoel, De Wet

AU - Friedland, Peter

AU - Atlas, Marcus

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - © 2016 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.Objective: Examine the accuracy of automated audiometry in a clinically heterogeneous population of adults using the KUDUwave automated audiometer. Design: Prospective accuracy study. Manual audiometry was performed in a sound-treated room and automated audiometry was not conducted in a sound-treated environment. Study sample: 42 consecutively recruited participants from a tertiary otolaryngology department in Western Australia. Results: Absolute mean differences ranged between 5.12–9.68 dB (air-conduction) and 8.26–15 dB (bone-conduction). A total of 86.5% of manual and automated 4FAs were within 10 dB (i.e. ±5 dB); 94.8% were within 15 dB. However, there were significant (p <0.05) differences between automated and manual audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (air-conduction) and 500 and 1000 Hz (bone-conduction). The effect of age (≥55 years) on accuracy (p = 0.014) was not significant on linear regression (p > 0.05; R2=0.11). The presence of a hearing loss (better ear ≥26 dB) did not significantly affect accuracy (p = 0.604; air-conduction), (p = 0.218; bone-conduction). Conclusions: This study provides clinical validation of automated audiometry using the KUDUwave in a clinically heterogeneous population, without the use of a sound-treated environment. Whilst threshold variations were statistically significant, future research is needed to ascertain the clinical significance of such variation.

AB - © 2016 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.Objective: Examine the accuracy of automated audiometry in a clinically heterogeneous population of adults using the KUDUwave automated audiometer. Design: Prospective accuracy study. Manual audiometry was performed in a sound-treated room and automated audiometry was not conducted in a sound-treated environment. Study sample: 42 consecutively recruited participants from a tertiary otolaryngology department in Western Australia. Results: Absolute mean differences ranged between 5.12–9.68 dB (air-conduction) and 8.26–15 dB (bone-conduction). A total of 86.5% of manual and automated 4FAs were within 10 dB (i.e. ±5 dB); 94.8% were within 15 dB. However, there were significant (p <0.05) differences between automated and manual audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz (air-conduction) and 500 and 1000 Hz (bone-conduction). The effect of age (≥55 years) on accuracy (p = 0.014) was not significant on linear regression (p > 0.05; R2=0.11). The presence of a hearing loss (better ear ≥26 dB) did not significantly affect accuracy (p = 0.604; air-conduction), (p = 0.218; bone-conduction). Conclusions: This study provides clinical validation of automated audiometry using the KUDUwave in a clinically heterogeneous population, without the use of a sound-treated environment. Whilst threshold variations were statistically significant, future research is needed to ascertain the clinical significance of such variation.

U2 - 10.1080/14992027.2016.1178858

DO - 10.1080/14992027.2016.1178858

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 507

EP - 513

JO - International Journal of Audiology

JF - International Journal of Audiology

SN - 1499-2027

IS - 9

ER -