Climate change in Western Australian agriculture: a bioeconomic and policy analysis

Tas Thamo

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    Abstract

    Modelling techniques were used to consider the impacts and policy aspects of climate change at the farm-level and the potential for carbon sequestration through the adoption of different land-management practices, using the Western Australian Wheatbelt region as a case-study. Benefits of adaptation were considerable. However, results suggest substantial reductions in profitability if the predicted warming and drying trend translates into large temperature increases and/or rainfall reductions. Production (crop yield) was less sensitive to climate change than profit. The potential for agriculture in the region to provide low-cost mitigation seems limited, particularly from soil carbon.
    LanguageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    Award date25 Jan 2017
    StateUnpublished - 2017

    Fingerprint

    policy analysis
    agriculture
    Australian Region
    climate change
    soil carbon
    profitability
    crop yield
    land management
    carbon sequestration
    management practice
    mitigation
    warming
    farm
    rainfall
    cost
    modeling
    temperature
    profit
    drying
    trend

    Cite this

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    title = "Climate change in Western Australian agriculture: a bioeconomic and policy analysis",
    abstract = "Modelling techniques were used to consider the impacts and policy aspects of climate change at the farm-level and the potential for carbon sequestration through the adoption of different land-management practices, using the Western Australian Wheatbelt region as a case-study. Benefits of adaptation were considerable. However, results suggest substantial reductions in profitability if the predicted warming and drying trend translates into large temperature increases and/or rainfall reductions. Production (crop yield) was less sensitive to climate change than profit. The potential for agriculture in the region to provide low-cost mitigation seems limited, particularly from soil carbon.",
    keywords = "Climate change, Sequestration, policy, Agriculture, Emissions, Impact, Economics, Adaptation",
    author = "Tas Thamo",
    year = "2017",
    language = "English",
    school = "The University of Western Australia",

    }

    Thamo, T 2017, 'Climate change in Western Australian agriculture: a bioeconomic and policy analysis', Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia.

    Climate change in Western Australian agriculture: a bioeconomic and policy analysis. / Thamo, Tas.

    2017.

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    TY - THES

    T1 - Climate change in Western Australian agriculture: a bioeconomic and policy analysis

    AU - Thamo,Tas

    PY - 2017

    Y1 - 2017

    N2 - Modelling techniques were used to consider the impacts and policy aspects of climate change at the farm-level and the potential for carbon sequestration through the adoption of different land-management practices, using the Western Australian Wheatbelt region as a case-study. Benefits of adaptation were considerable. However, results suggest substantial reductions in profitability if the predicted warming and drying trend translates into large temperature increases and/or rainfall reductions. Production (crop yield) was less sensitive to climate change than profit. The potential for agriculture in the region to provide low-cost mitigation seems limited, particularly from soil carbon.

    AB - Modelling techniques were used to consider the impacts and policy aspects of climate change at the farm-level and the potential for carbon sequestration through the adoption of different land-management practices, using the Western Australian Wheatbelt region as a case-study. Benefits of adaptation were considerable. However, results suggest substantial reductions in profitability if the predicted warming and drying trend translates into large temperature increases and/or rainfall reductions. Production (crop yield) was less sensitive to climate change than profit. The potential for agriculture in the region to provide low-cost mitigation seems limited, particularly from soil carbon.

    KW - Climate change

    KW - Sequestration

    KW - policy

    KW - Agriculture

    KW - Emissions

    KW - Impact

    KW - Economics

    KW - Adaptation

    M3 - Doctoral Thesis

    ER -