Children with East Asian-Born Parents Have an Increased Risk of Allergy but May Not Have More Asthma in Early Childhood

HealthNuts study group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We previously reported that infants with Asian-born parents are 3 times more likely to have IgE-mediated food allergy than those with Australian-born parents. It is unknown whether this translates to the increased risk of other allergic diseases later in childhood and whether ancestry interacts with other risk factors for allergic disease development. Objective: To compare prevalence and risk factors for allergic rhinitis, asthma, and aeroallergen sensitization at age 6 between children with East Asian-born and Caucasian-born parents. Methods: A total of 5276 1-year-old infants were recruited into a population-based longitudinal study of allergy. A total of 4455 children participated in age 6 follow-up (84.4%), including 3015 with Caucasian-born parents and 415 with East Asian-born parents. Children underwent skin prick tests to aeroallergens and questionnaires captured data on asthma, eczema, and allergic rhinitis. Results: Compared with children with Caucasian-born parents, children of East Asian-born parents had more allergic rhinitis (19.9% [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-26] vs 9.3% [95% CI 8-10.8], P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)539-547.e3
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

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