Characterization of Fitzroy River virus and serologic evidence of human and animal infection

Cheryl A. Johansen, Simon H. Williams, Lorna F. Melville, Jay Nicholson, Roy A. Hall, Helle Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Natalie A. Prow, Glenys R. Chidlow, Shani Wong, Rohini Sinha, David T. Williams, W. Ian Lipkin, David William Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In northern Western Australia in 2011 and 2012, surveillance detected a novel arbovirus in mosquitoes. Genetic and phenotypic analyses confirmed that the new flavivirus, named Fitzroy River virus, is related to Sepik virus and Wes-selsbron virus, in the yellow fever virus group. Most (81%) isolates came from Aedes normanensis mosquitoes, providing circumstantial evidence of the probable vector. In cell culture, Fitzroy River virus replicated in mosquito (C6/36), mammalian (Vero, PSEK, and BSR), and avian (DF-1) cells. It also infected intraperitoneally inoculated weanling mice and caused mild clinical disease in 3 intracranially inoculated mice. Specific neutralizing antibodies were detected in sentinel horses (12.6%), cattle (6.6%), and chickens (0.5%) in the Northern Territory of Australia and in a subset of humans (0.8%) from northern Western Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1289-1299
Number of pages11
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2017

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Rivers
Culicidae
Viruses
Western Australia
Infection
Yellow fever virus
Northern Territory
Arboviruses
Flavivirus
Aedes
Neutralizing Antibodies
Horses
Chickens
Cell Culture Techniques

Cite this

Johansen, Cheryl A. ; Williams, Simon H. ; Melville, Lorna F. ; Nicholson, Jay ; Hall, Roy A. ; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle ; Prow, Natalie A. ; Chidlow, Glenys R. ; Wong, Shani ; Sinha, Rohini ; Williams, David T. ; Lipkin, W. Ian ; Smith, David William. / Characterization of Fitzroy River virus and serologic evidence of human and animal infection. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 8. pp. 1289-1299.
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Johansen, CA, Williams, SH, Melville, LF, Nicholson, J, Hall, RA, Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H, Prow, NA, Chidlow, GR, Wong, S, Sinha, R, Williams, DT, Lipkin, WI & Smith, DW 2017, 'Characterization of Fitzroy River virus and serologic evidence of human and animal infection' Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 23, no. 8, pp. 1289-1299. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2308.161440

Characterization of Fitzroy River virus and serologic evidence of human and animal infection. / Johansen, Cheryl A.; Williams, Simon H.; Melville, Lorna F.; Nicholson, Jay; Hall, Roy A.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Prow, Natalie A.; Chidlow, Glenys R.; Wong, Shani; Sinha, Rohini; Williams, David T.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Smith, David William.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 23, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 1289-1299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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