Characteristics of people on community treatment orders in Australia: Data from the 2010 National Survey of High Impact Psychosis

Shuichi Suetani, Steve Kisely, Stephen D. Parker, Anna Waterreus, Vera A Morgan, Dan Siskind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Existing evidence on factors associated with community treatment order placement is largely restricted to administrative data. We utilised the data from a large nationally representative sample to compare the demographic, clinical, social functioning, substance use and service utilisation profiles of people living with psychosis under community treatment orders with those who were not.

METHODS: Participants were grouped based on whether they had been subject to a community treatment order in the past 12 months or not. We conducted logistic regressions to examine demographic, clinical, social functioning, substance use and service utilisation profiles associated with the two groups.

RESULTS: People who had recently been subject to community treatment orders were more likely to be treated with long-acting injectable antipsychotics and lacked insight but were less likely to report suicidal ideation. They also had higher psychiatric inpatient admission rates but a lower frequency of general practitioner visits.

CONCLUSION: People on community treatment orders in Australia may differ from those who are not under a community treatment order in their treatment needs. Resources and care provision must match the needs of this particularly vulnerable group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48674211036032
JournalThe Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Aug 2021

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