Characterisation of Murray Valley encephalitis virus recombinant subviral particles and their ability to protect mice against lethal challenge with virulent wild-type virus

Melissa Kroeger

    Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

    47 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated] Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVE) is a member of the Flavivirus genus within the family Flaviviridae (Monath & Heinz, 1996). Like other flaviviruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JE), dengue viruses (DEN), West Nile virus (WN) and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBE), MVE causes clinically significant disease in humans (reviewed in Monath and Heinz, 1996). Approximately 1 in 1000 infections with MVE results in clinical disease (Anderson, 1954). Of those developing clinical disease, approximately 20-40% of cases are fatal. MVE is believed to be endemic in the tropical Kimberley region, and epidemic in the Pilbara and Gascoyne regions of WA (Mackenzie et al., 1993; Broom et al., 1989). Cases of Murray Valley encephalitis occur annually in northern Australia in association with increased mosquito activity during the wet season (Marshall, 1988; Mackenzie et al., 1993; Burrow et al., 1998). A recent epidemiological study by Cordova et al. (2000) reported nine encephalitogenic cases of MVE in the period March to July 2000, with four of the cases acquiring MVE infection in the more southerly Midwest regions of Western Australia, areas from which no human cases of MVE have previously been reported.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationMasters
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2002

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