Characterisation of low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced neuroplasticity in rodent and experimental models

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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    Abstract

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is commonly used to induce neuroplasticity in humans. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying rTMS-induced neuroplasticity remain unclear. This thesis investigates the mechanisms of low-intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS) induced plasticity in the intact and injured nervous systems using rodent and experimental models. In addition, we describe the development and validation of rodent-specific rTMS coils. Our results show that Ll-rTMS induces functional and behavioural plasticity in the intact nervous system but fails to induce neuroplasticity following neurotrauma .The outcomes of this thesis provide critical Insights into the mechanisms and use of rTMS that will inform clinical practice.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    Award date5 Jan 2017
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2016

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    Neuronal Plasticity
    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
    Rodentia
    Theoretical Models
    Nervous System

    Cite this

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    title = "Characterisation of low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced neuroplasticity in rodent and experimental models",
    abstract = "Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is commonly used to induce neuroplasticity in humans. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying rTMS-induced neuroplasticity remain unclear. This thesis investigates the mechanisms of low-intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS) induced plasticity in the intact and injured nervous systems using rodent and experimental models. In addition, we describe the development and validation of rodent-specific rTMS coils. Our results show that Ll-rTMS induces functional and behavioural plasticity in the intact nervous system but fails to induce neuroplasticity following neurotrauma .The outcomes of this thesis provide critical Insights into the mechanisms and use of rTMS that will inform clinical practice.",
    keywords = "Non-invasive brain stimulation, Neurophysiology, Neuroplasticity, Neurotrauma",
    author = "Alexander Tang",
    year = "2016",
    language = "English",
    school = "The University of Western Australia",

    }

    TY - THES

    T1 - Characterisation of low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced neuroplasticity in rodent and experimental models

    AU - Tang, Alexander

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is commonly used to induce neuroplasticity in humans. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying rTMS-induced neuroplasticity remain unclear. This thesis investigates the mechanisms of low-intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS) induced plasticity in the intact and injured nervous systems using rodent and experimental models. In addition, we describe the development and validation of rodent-specific rTMS coils. Our results show that Ll-rTMS induces functional and behavioural plasticity in the intact nervous system but fails to induce neuroplasticity following neurotrauma .The outcomes of this thesis provide critical Insights into the mechanisms and use of rTMS that will inform clinical practice.

    AB - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is commonly used to induce neuroplasticity in humans. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying rTMS-induced neuroplasticity remain unclear. This thesis investigates the mechanisms of low-intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS) induced plasticity in the intact and injured nervous systems using rodent and experimental models. In addition, we describe the development and validation of rodent-specific rTMS coils. Our results show that Ll-rTMS induces functional and behavioural plasticity in the intact nervous system but fails to induce neuroplasticity following neurotrauma .The outcomes of this thesis provide critical Insights into the mechanisms and use of rTMS that will inform clinical practice.

    KW - Non-invasive brain stimulation

    KW - Neurophysiology

    KW - Neuroplasticity

    KW - Neurotrauma

    M3 - Doctoral Thesis

    ER -