Changing Channels: Scheduling, Temporality, New Technologies (And The Future Of ‘Television’ In Media Studies)

Rob Cover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper argues that the processes of digitisation and a user-based taste for interactivity have far-reaching implications for broadcast television. While much previous writing has focused on the ways in which digitisation impacts on broadcast television production regulation, market demand, competition, and
policy, this study's interested in the ways in which we can theorise the impact of interactivity on television viewers' engagement with alternative forms of television distribution. It is argued that rigid television scheduling and the flow of television series as 'slow release' is increasingly less compatible with potential viewing patterns of everyday western urban viewers, and that access to television series through DVD releases and Internet downloads results frame an emerging cultural desire or demand by viewers for greater control over the temporal aspects of television entertainment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-24
JournalAustralian Journal of Communication
Volume32
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

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