Changes in cognitive measures associated with a lifestyle program for treated hypertensives: a randomized controlled trial (ADAPT)

Valerie Burke, Jacqueline Mansour, Trevor Mori, Lawrence Beilin, Hayley Cutt, A. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cognitive changes are reported infrequently in programs targeting cardiovascular risk. We examined self-efficacy, behavioral barriers and health beliefs in a lifestyle program for drug-treated hypertensives that aimed to reduce blood pressure, antihypertensive drug needs and cardiovascular risk. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared usual care (controls) and a 4-month program focusing on weight loss, diet and exercise. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 4 months and 1-year follow-up. Of 241 individuals randomized, 102/123 in the program and 90/118 of controls completed follow-up. In the program group, dietary barriers fell by 14% at 4 months (controls 2%, P = 0.025) and by 8% at follow-up (controls 3%, P = 0.010). Exercise barriers fell by 11% at 4 months (controls 3%, P = 0.020) and 17% (controls 4%, P = 0.002) at follow-up. Dietary self-efficacy improved by 3% at 4 months (controls -1%, P = 0.003) and by 2% at follow-up (controls -1%, P = 0.051). Exercise self-efficacy increased by 8% at 4 months (controls 3%, P <0.001) and by 5% at follow-up (controls 3%, P = 0.130). Changes in cognitive variables predicted changes in health-related behaviors at 4 months and follow-up. A cognitively based lifestyle program in treated hypertensives is associated with improvements in cognitive measures in the shorter and longer term.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-217
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Self Efficacy
Life Style
Randomized Controlled Trials
Reducing Diet
Health
Antihypertensive Agents
self-efficacy
Blood Pressure
Pharmaceutical Preparations
drug
health

Cite this

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title = "Changes in cognitive measures associated with a lifestyle program for treated hypertensives: a randomized controlled trial (ADAPT)",
abstract = "Cognitive changes are reported infrequently in programs targeting cardiovascular risk. We examined self-efficacy, behavioral barriers and health beliefs in a lifestyle program for drug-treated hypertensives that aimed to reduce blood pressure, antihypertensive drug needs and cardiovascular risk. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared usual care (controls) and a 4-month program focusing on weight loss, diet and exercise. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 4 months and 1-year follow-up. Of 241 individuals randomized, 102/123 in the program and 90/118 of controls completed follow-up. In the program group, dietary barriers fell by 14{\%} at 4 months (controls 2{\%}, P = 0.025) and by 8{\%} at follow-up (controls 3{\%}, P = 0.010). Exercise barriers fell by 11{\%} at 4 months (controls 3{\%}, P = 0.020) and 17{\%} (controls 4{\%}, P = 0.002) at follow-up. Dietary self-efficacy improved by 3{\%} at 4 months (controls -1{\%}, P = 0.003) and by 2{\%} at follow-up (controls -1{\%}, P = 0.051). Exercise self-efficacy increased by 8{\%} at 4 months (controls 3{\%}, P <0.001) and by 5{\%} at follow-up (controls 3{\%}, P = 0.130). Changes in cognitive variables predicted changes in health-related behaviors at 4 months and follow-up. A cognitively based lifestyle program in treated hypertensives is associated with improvements in cognitive measures in the shorter and longer term.",
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Changes in cognitive measures associated with a lifestyle program for treated hypertensives: a randomized controlled trial (ADAPT). / Burke, Valerie; Mansour, Jacqueline; Mori, Trevor; Beilin, Lawrence; Cutt, Hayley; Wilson, A.

In: Health Education Research, Vol. 23, No. 2, 2008, p. 202-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Wilson, A.

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