Cause or consequence: an investigation of the factors determining the onset and development of stuttering

Charn Nang

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    225 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated abstract] Current research indicates that the onset, recovery and persistence of stuttering stem from a number of complex factors and their interaction with speech motor control processes. The use of non-speech and quasi-speech tasks have helped to increase the understanding of speech production processes involved with stuttering, however results from such studies are somewhat inconsistent and do not reflect natural speaking contexts. It is often difficult to ascertain the direction of causality of findings. The aims of the research reported in this thesis were as follows: Define speech and language fluency profiles for individuals at different stages of stuttering. Compare speech and language fluency profiles for children with and without a family history of stuttering. Determine whether the observed changes in speech and language fluency profiles associated with stuttering are a cause or consequence of stuttering. Speech production measures were gathered through natural and age-appropriate speaking contexts from three age groups to capture different stages of stuttering. The three age groups were of young children (longitudinal design), school-aged children, and adults. To investigate familial history as a risk factor for the onset of stuttering, young children with and without positive family history were investigated over a period of nine months with the first data session being prior to any stuttering onset. During the study some children were diagnosed with stuttering. This allowed for further investigation of the relevant risk factors associated with the onset of stuttering, and speech production development associated with and without stuttering.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2012

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