Catch! Movement kinematics of two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder

S.N. Sekaran, Siobhan Reid, A.W. Chin, S. Ndiaye, Melissa Licari

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose: To quantify two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) by examining sequencing of the upper limb and trunk segments, and degree of symmetry.Method: Thirteen boys with DCD ((x) over bar = 9.36 years +/- 0.68) and 13 Controls ((x) over bar = 9.16 years +/- 0.68) participated. Children performed 10 two-handed central catching trials, with the best five trials selected for analysis.Results: The DCD group displayed greater variability in range of motion across all joint rotations in the catch phase. Specifically, increased shoulder flexion, thorax extension and elbow extension. Although the initiation of segmental movement occurred in the same order for the two groups, the DCD group initiated wrist extension considerably earlier. The DCD group also exhibited significant asymmetry in elbow flexion-extension.Conclusion: Despite success in performing this simple catching task (88% successful), the DCD group displayed an inefficient, variable and less symmetrical catching technique. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)27-32
    JournalGAIT & POSTURE
    Volume36
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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    Motor Skills Disorders
    Biomechanical Phenomena
    Elbow
    Articular Range of Motion
    Wrist
    Upper Extremity
    Thorax
    Joints

    Cite this

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    title = "Catch! Movement kinematics of two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder",
    abstract = "Purpose: To quantify two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) by examining sequencing of the upper limb and trunk segments, and degree of symmetry.Method: Thirteen boys with DCD ((x) over bar = 9.36 years +/- 0.68) and 13 Controls ((x) over bar = 9.16 years +/- 0.68) participated. Children performed 10 two-handed central catching trials, with the best five trials selected for analysis.Results: The DCD group displayed greater variability in range of motion across all joint rotations in the catch phase. Specifically, increased shoulder flexion, thorax extension and elbow extension. Although the initiation of segmental movement occurred in the same order for the two groups, the DCD group initiated wrist extension considerably earlier. The DCD group also exhibited significant asymmetry in elbow flexion-extension.Conclusion: Despite success in performing this simple catching task (88{\%} successful), the DCD group displayed an inefficient, variable and less symmetrical catching technique. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
    author = "S.N. Sekaran and Siobhan Reid and A.W. Chin and S. Ndiaye and Melissa Licari",
    year = "2012",
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    language = "English",
    volume = "36",
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    Catch! Movement kinematics of two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder. / Sekaran, S.N.; Reid, Siobhan; Chin, A.W.; Ndiaye, S.; Licari, Melissa.

    In: GAIT & POSTURE, Vol. 36, 2012, p. 27-32.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Catch! Movement kinematics of two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    AU - Sekaran, S.N.

    AU - Reid, Siobhan

    AU - Chin, A.W.

    AU - Ndiaye, S.

    AU - Licari, Melissa

    PY - 2012

    Y1 - 2012

    N2 - Purpose: To quantify two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) by examining sequencing of the upper limb and trunk segments, and degree of symmetry.Method: Thirteen boys with DCD ((x) over bar = 9.36 years +/- 0.68) and 13 Controls ((x) over bar = 9.16 years +/- 0.68) participated. Children performed 10 two-handed central catching trials, with the best five trials selected for analysis.Results: The DCD group displayed greater variability in range of motion across all joint rotations in the catch phase. Specifically, increased shoulder flexion, thorax extension and elbow extension. Although the initiation of segmental movement occurred in the same order for the two groups, the DCD group initiated wrist extension considerably earlier. The DCD group also exhibited significant asymmetry in elbow flexion-extension.Conclusion: Despite success in performing this simple catching task (88% successful), the DCD group displayed an inefficient, variable and less symmetrical catching technique. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    AB - Purpose: To quantify two-handed catching in boys with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) by examining sequencing of the upper limb and trunk segments, and degree of symmetry.Method: Thirteen boys with DCD ((x) over bar = 9.36 years +/- 0.68) and 13 Controls ((x) over bar = 9.16 years +/- 0.68) participated. Children performed 10 two-handed central catching trials, with the best five trials selected for analysis.Results: The DCD group displayed greater variability in range of motion across all joint rotations in the catch phase. Specifically, increased shoulder flexion, thorax extension and elbow extension. Although the initiation of segmental movement occurred in the same order for the two groups, the DCD group initiated wrist extension considerably earlier. The DCD group also exhibited significant asymmetry in elbow flexion-extension.Conclusion: Despite success in performing this simple catching task (88% successful), the DCD group displayed an inefficient, variable and less symmetrical catching technique. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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    JO - GAIT & POSTURE

    JF - GAIT & POSTURE

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