Caregivers of Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Psychosocial Factors and Evidence for Self-compassion as a Potential Intervention Target

Zoe Biddle, Frances V. O’Callaghan, Amy L. Finlay-Jones, Natasha E. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition involving lifelong challenges for both children and their families. The aim of the current study was to explore experiences of caregivers of children, adolescents and young adults diagnosed with FASD. More specifically, we examined the relationship between shame, guilt, pride, self-compassion and caregiver psychological distress. It was hypothesised that shame, guilt, pride and self-compassion would be uniquely associated with caregiver psychological distress. We also examined differences between biological and non-biological caregivers on these variables. It was hypothesised that relative to non-biological caregivers, biological parents would (i) report significantly higher levels of psychological distress, guilt and shame and (ii) report significantly lower self-compassion scores. Methods: The current study included 175 caregivers of children and young people diagnosed with FASD. Caregivers completed an online survey that included a range of standardised self-report measures that assessed psychological distress, shame, guilt, pride and self-compassion. Results: Caregiver self-compassion was negatively correlated with psychological distress, shame and guilt, and positively correlated with pride. Hierarchical multiple regression controlling for significant caregiver demographics revealed that shame, pride, guilt and self-compassion accounted for 68.1% of the variance in caregiver psychological distress. Shame and self-compassion were both unique significant factors in the final model. Some preliminary differences between caregiver groups were also found; specifically, biological parents reported higher levels of guilt compared with non-biological caregivers. Conclusions: The current findings revealed shame, pride, guilt and self-compassion were associated with caregiver psychological distress. Self-compassion and shame were identified as unique contributors to caregiver psychological distress. Future longitudinal research is required to establish if these associations may be casual, which will provide a useful starting point for further investigation into the efficacy of interventions that target self-compassion for promoting better psychological outcomes in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2189-2198
Number of pages10
JournalMindfulness
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2020
Externally publishedYes

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