Carboxylate composition of root exudates does not relate consistently to a crop species' ability to use phosphorus from aluminium, iron or calcium phosphate sources

Stuart Pearse, Erik Veneklaas, Greg Cawthray, Michael Bolland, Hans Lambers

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    99 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The relationship between carboxylate release from roots and the ability of the species to utilize phosphorus from sparingly soluble forms was studied by comparing Triticum aestivum, Brassica napus, Cicer arietinum, Pisum sativum, Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius and Lupinus cosentinii.Plants were grown in sand and supplied with 40 mg P kg(-1) in the sparingly soluble forms AIPO(4), FePO4 or Ca5O(H)(PO4)(3), or as soluble KH2PO4; control plants received no P.The ability to utilize sparingly soluble forms of P differed between forms of P supplied and species. Pisum sativum and C. arietinum did not access AIPO(4) or FePO4 despite releasing carboxylates into the rhizosphere.Species accessed different forms of sparingly soluble P, but no species was superior in accessing all forms. We conclude that a single trait cannot explain access to different forms of sparingly soluble P, and hypothesize that in addition to carboxylates, rhizosphere pH and root morphology are key factors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)181-190
    JournalNew Phytologist
    Volume173
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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