Can Rhythm Change the Brain? Investigating the effect of a novel music-motor therapy app, GotRhythm, on motor control and corticospinal excitability in healthy and clinical populations.

Katherine Hankinson

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) is a form of music therapy that can improve motor outcomes in clinical populations, e.g., stroke and Parkinson’s Disease patients. The underlying mechanisms of RAS are currently unknown. I used a novel music- motor therapy app, GotRhythm, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) to determine if a brief period of RAS training could increase corticospinal excitability (CSE) compared to a control motor task in healthy young and older adults, and stroke- survivors. The results demonstrated that combining GotRhythm training with a challenging task can increase CSE in healthy young adults, identifying a potential mechanism underpinning efficacy of RAS therapy
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Rodger, Jennifer, Supervisor
  • Rosenberg, Michael, Supervisor
  • Shaykevich, Alex, Supervisor
  • Vallence, Ann-Maree, Supervisor
  • Etherton-Beer, Christopher, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date16 Aug 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021

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