Caldera structure of submarine Volcano #1 on the Tonga Arc at 21°09'S, southwestern Pacific: Analysis of multichannel seismic profiling

H. Kim, H. Jou, G. Lee, J. Na, UGeun Jang, K. Lee, C. Kim, S. Lee, C. Park, S. Jung, B. Suk

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    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Volcano #1 is a large submarine stratovolcano with a summit caldera in the south central part of the Tonga Arc. We collected and analyzed multichannel seismic profiles in conjunction with magnetic data from Volcano #1 to investigate the structure of the intracaldera fill and processes of caldera formation. The intracaldera fill, exhibiting stratified units with a maximum thickness of 2 km, consists of at least four seismic units and a thick wedge of landslide debris derived from the caldera wall. The structural caldera floor, deepening toward the northwestern rim, suggests asymmetric collapse in the initial stage, which, in turn, appears to have contributed to the creation of a caldera elongated to the northwest by enhancing gravitational instability along the northwestern caldera boundary. Occasional, but repeated, eruptions resulted in a thick accumulation of the intracaldera fill and further subsidence in the mode of piston collapse. Magnetization lows are well-defined along the structural rim of the caldera that is interpreted as the inner principal ring fault. The magnetization lows indicate sites of submarine hydrothermal vents that caused an alteration of magnetic minerals. Faults recognized on the outer slope of the volcano are interpreted to be involved in hydrothermal fluid circulation. Copyright © The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)893-900
    JournalEARTH PLANETS AND SPACE
    Volume65
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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